A Preface to Urban Economics

By Wilbur R. Thompson | Go to book overview

PREFACE

Three years ago the author undertook to describe and evaluate a subject matter which gave promise of becoming a new field of thought: the economics of urban growth and development. Very early in this effort it became clear that the inexorable trend toward very large, extremely complex, urban places would make the understanding and management of the process of urbanization one of the two or three most challenging and critical domestic issues of the latter half of the twentieth century. And it seemed inconceivable that the skills of the economist would not be needed.

A corollary judgment was also reached that since the city is much less a pure economic organism than the firm or industry with which economists have traditionally been concerned, the conventional wisdom of economics would not translate easily nor even be enough. A long study was in prospect. Further, the distinguishing characteristic of economics is the rigor that is achieved through formal methods of analysis--mathematical and statistical techniques. But the promise of economic analysis is realized only when the simplifications that permit the construction of formal analytical models do not entail too great a cost in realism and social significance. The research strategy chosen, therefore, was to break the surface of this new and strange world by first composing a preface to urban economics, skipping lightly across nearly the full reaches of the city. Only then, with some feeling for the half-dozen or so critical variables that determine in large part the form and functioning of the city, might significant progress be made toward formulating theories and setting forth rigorous principles. A decade would surely be needed to prepare a true "principles of urban economics." The work of testing and reformulating hypotheses has, of course, no end.

This preface to urban economics is, then, a first step or at best an intermediate product. But a new field can languish for lack of easily accessible educational materials. University faculty members, for example, are most reluctant to teach courses in new fields, prior to the existence of textbooks or reasonable facsimiles thereof; it is very difficult and inefficient to base courses on fugitive, specialized pamphlets and journal articles existing only in single library copies. State and local finance, a subject closely related to urban economics, is still an infrequently scheduled course, reflecting decades of bare existence without good teaching materials. Today specialists in this field are

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Preface to Urban Economics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 418

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.