A Preface to Urban Economics

By Wilbur R. Thompson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3
Income Inequality: Personal and Governmental Poverty

The study of income distribution is perhaps the most underdeveloped area in the world of economics. The hesitancy of economists to tackle this subject is partly due to the inherent complexity of the material and partly due to the rapidity with which almost all analyses of income distribution "degenerate" into value judgments or ethics-- leave the comfortable and dispassionate realm of pure theory so hospitable to the "scientific method." Firm conclusions on small questions seem to be more satisfying than rough, tentative judgments on big ones.

With very little literature to summarize and evaluate, with almost no empirical findings to report, our best course of action would seem to be to cast about for a conceptual framework within which subsequent empirical efforts might be organized. A three-part, integrated schema is suggested as a point of departure.

First, we begin by considering the metropolitan area as a whole in its capacity as a single local labor market, within which the basic degree of local interpersonal income inequality is determined. The likely influence of the local population size, industry mix, and racial composition on the degree of interpersonal income inequality will be considered.

Second, given this basic amount of area-wide, interpersonal income inequality, we move to the submetropolitan area level and examine the degree to which it is translated into intergovernmental differentials in per capita income. Because the political subdivisions of a metropolitan area are largely autonomous in matters of local public finance, differentials in per capita income create inequalities in both fiscal capacity and public service needs between municipalities. And because we entrust local government to effect substantial redistribution of real income through local public services, a serious problem follows from the divorcing of income from need.

-105-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Preface to Urban Economics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 418

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.