Chronology
1789 James Cooper (the "Fenimore" was added in 1826)
born September 15 at Burlington, New Jersey.
1790Family moved to Cooperstown, New York, in No-
vember.
1803-Entered Yale College in February, 1803. Dismissed for
1805misconduct in 1805.
1806-Went to sea as common sailor on the Stirling, October,
1807 1806, to prepare for entering Navy. Visited England
and Spain. Returned to America in September, 1807.
1808-Commissioned midshipman in the Navy, January 1,
1811 1808. Served on the Vesuvius, was stationed at Oswego
on Lake Ontario, and served under Lawrence on the
Wasp. Resigned after three and a half years service,
the last year of which was spent on furlough.
1811-Married Susan Augusta DeLancey, January 1, 1811.
1820To them were born five daughters and two sons. Set-
tled in Westchester in 1817, after living at Mamaroneck
and at Cooperstown. Built home at Angevine Farm
near Scarsdale in 1818.
1820Began literary career with Precaution.
1821-The period of Cooper's greatest success, most of which
1826was spent in New York City, and during which he
published The Spy ( 1821), The Pioneers ( 1823), The
Pilot
( 1824), Lionel Lincoln ( 1825), The Last of the
Mohicans
( 1826).
1826-Sailed for Europe with his family, June 1, 1826. Landed
1828in England, then went to Paris in July, 1826, where he
stayed until February, 1828. Published The Prairie
( 1827), The Red Rover ( 1827).
1828-In London from March through May, 1828. Crossed to
1830Low Countries and journeyed to Switzerland. In Oc-

-11-

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James Fenimore Cooper
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Preface 7
  • Contents 9
  • Chronology 11
  • Chapter 1 - Beginnings 17
  • Chapter 2 - The American Past 26
  • Chapter 3 - Europe and the United States 56
  • Chapter 4 - Values in Conflict 91
  • Chapter 5 - The Decay of Principle 115
  • Chapter 6 - A General Estimate 145
  • Notes and References 157
  • Selected Bibliography 165
  • Index 172
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