Military Leadership: In Pursuit of Excellence

By Robert L. Taylor; William E. Rosenbach | Go to book overview

4
Leadership: Views from Readers

Leadership:
A Dependent's View

Green rows of mud-covered men silently marching past my front yard; sergeants and officers excitedly "talking shop" in my quarters' living room; and the solemn, respectful, changes of command that I have attended -- each has given me the opportunity to see what leaders can and should be. As a dependent, I've seen the kind of commanders who watch their drenched, red-clayed soldiers slide up and down ravines while they sit in a dry, clean jeep. But growing up through countless Hails and Farewells, I've talked to leaders who stress participating in training, not just observing. These are the commanders for whom coldness and fatigue may threaten, yet cannot hinder, a mission from being accomplished. The leader who is known for thinking ahead, for inspirational actions, for always remaining flexible, and focusing on the important is the leader I can strive to become.

-- Ms. Kerith Dana Dubik, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas


Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson

Leadership's concepts are epitomized in General "Stonewall" Jackson. He personifies 10 of FM 22-100's 11 attributes of good leadership. He sought self-improvement, was proficient at the art, responsible and soundly decisive; he led by example, cared for his troops, developed subordinates, ensured task completion, trained his team, and used his unit according to its capabilities. By using these sound principles long before they were set down formally, his units performed feats far in excess of what other commanders extracted from their men. His flanking maneuver at Chancellorsville is the historical forerunner of General H. Norman Schwarzkopf "Hail Mary".

-- Major Warner D. Farr, USA, Brooks AFB, Texas

Reprinted by permission from Military Review, 72:8 ( August 1992), pp. 53-62.

-37-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Military Leadership: In Pursuit of Excellence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 257

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.