A History of Developmental Psychology in Autobiography

By Dennis Thompson; John D. Hogano | Go to book overview

accepted on a par of importance with more traditional topics. Apparently it will take roughly a generation for organizational changes to occur that will support scholarship, research, and teaching about the course of adult life. Being convinced of the scientific importance as well as the practical implications of studying adult development and aging, I am impatient with systems and individuals that appear blind to the significance of the subject matter.

Perhaps one of the most convincing statements of this character was made to me by Phillip Handler, a distinguished biochemist at Duke University and later president of the National Academy of Science. He said that he had taught and done research in biochemistry during its building-block stage. His biochemistry book, used by medical students, described the components of the metabolic cycles of organic systems. He said that this was the biochemistry of the past and present, but that the biochemistry of the future was going to be the biochemistry of differentiation and aging. That is, the building blocks of the systems have to be placed in a dynamic context.

By analogy, I think that it is now time to say that the psychology of the future will be the psychology of development and aging. Already we are seeing the ending chapters of introductory psychology textbooks emphasizing development and aging. This trend will continue, I believe, and one will see the "building-block topics" of psychology placed in a dynamic context of how they differentiate, develop, and age. The essential point here is that research on elemental behavioral processes studied by psychology do not, in and of themselves, explain phenomena of development and aging or the dynamics of change. Studies of sensation, perception, learning, memory, intelligence, and so on, do not produce knowledge that contradicts development and aging, but they do not explain the dynamic processes. In this regard, I believe that in the future there will be a stronger organismic orientation, and we will take seriously that the organism is a self-regulating system and, to a considerable degree, a self-structuring system providing its own energy for change. With the growth of research, psychology will undoubtedly come to recognize patterns of adult change related to different outcomes and develop interventions to maximize productivity and the quality of life.


References

Birren, J. E. ( 1955). Age differences in startle reaction time of the rat to noise and electric shock. Journal of Gerontology, 10, 437-440.

Birren, J. E., Allen, W. R. & Landau, H. G. ( 1954). The relation of problem length in simple addition to time required, probability of success and age. Journal of Gerontology, 9, 150-161.

Birren, J. E. & Botwinick, J. ( 1951). Rate of addition as a function of difficulty and age. Psychometrika, 16, 219-232.

Birren, J. E. & Botwinick, J. ( 1955a). Age difference in finger, jaw, and foot reaction time in auditory stimuli. Journal of Gerontology, 10, 429-432.

Birren, J. E. & Botwinick, J. ( 1955b). Speed of responses as a function of perceptual difficulty and age. Journal of Gerontology, 10, 433-436.

-44-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of Developmental Psychology in Autobiography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • References x
  • 1 - Louise Bates Ames 1
  • Notes 21
  • References 21
  • 2 - James Emmett Birren 24
  • References 44
  • 3 - Marie Skodak Crissey 46
  • Notes 69
  • Representative Publications 69
  • 4 - David Elkind 71
  • References 83
  • 5 - Dale B. Harris 84
  • References 103
  • 6 - Lois Wladis Hoffman 105
  • References 119
  • 7 - Çiǧdem KaǧitçebaŞi 121
  • Notes 133
  • Representative Publications 133
  • 8 - Lewis P. Lipsitt 137
  • References 158
  • 9 - Paul Mussen 161
  • References 177
  • 10 - Seymour Wapner 180
  • Notes 199
  • References 199
  • About the Book and Editors 209
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 209

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.