A History of Developmental Psychology in Autobiography

By Dennis Thompson; John D. Hogano | Go to book overview

This is important. It does not mean that we have to abandon social science. It does mean that we have to be aware of our dual position and to make every effort to ensure that our personal biases and attitudes do not affect our data collection or interpretations. We also have to think about the social repercussions of our work. We have too many examples of personal biases reported as objective scientific findings, with long-term negative consequences as a result. Finally, it troubles me greatly that my own discipline seems so little concerned with the deteriorating condition of children and youth in our society. I believe that we as social scientists must have a moral as well as a scientific conscience. If we do not care about the children and youth we study, then our results will never attain true significance, statistical or otherwise.


References

Elkind, D. ( 1967). "Egocentrism in adolescents". Child Development, 38, 1025-1034

Elkind, D. ( 1975). "Perceptual development in children". American Scientist, 63, 535-541

Elkind, D. ( 1976). "Child development and education". New York: Oxford University Press

Elkind, D. ( 1981). The hurried child. Reading, Mass.: Addison Wesley

Elkind, D. ( 1984). All grown up and no place to go: Teenagers in crisis. Reading, Mass.: Addison Wesley

Elkind, D. ( 1987). Miseducation: Preschoolers at risk. New York: Knopf

Elkind, D. ( 1994). Ties that stress: A new family imbalance. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.


Representative Publications

Elkind, D. ( 1961). "The development of the additive composition of classes in the child" Journal of Genetic Psychology, 99, 51-57

Elkind, D. ( 1961). "The child's conception of right and left". Journal of Genetic Psychology, 99, 269-276

Elkind, D. ( 1961). "The child's conception of his religious denomination": The Jewish child Journal of Genetic Psychology, 99, 209-223

Elkind, D. ( 1968, May 26). "Jean Piaget: Giant in the nursery". The New York Times Magazine, 6, 27-32

Elkind, D. ( 1970, April 5). "Erik H. Erikson: Eight stages of man". New York Times Magazine, 6, 23-32

Elkind, D. ( 1986). "Early education and formal education: A necessary difference". Phi Delta Kappan, 67, 631-636

Elkind, D., Koegler, R. R. ∧ Go, E. ( 1962). Effects of perceptual training at three age levels Science, 137, 383-386.

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A History of Developmental Psychology in Autobiography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • References x
  • 1 - Louise Bates Ames 1
  • Notes 21
  • References 21
  • 2 - James Emmett Birren 24
  • References 44
  • 3 - Marie Skodak Crissey 46
  • Notes 69
  • Representative Publications 69
  • 4 - David Elkind 71
  • References 83
  • 5 - Dale B. Harris 84
  • References 103
  • 6 - Lois Wladis Hoffman 105
  • References 119
  • 7 - Çiǧdem KaǧitçebaŞi 121
  • Notes 133
  • Representative Publications 133
  • 8 - Lewis P. Lipsitt 137
  • References 158
  • 9 - Paul Mussen 161
  • References 177
  • 10 - Seymour Wapner 180
  • Notes 199
  • References 199
  • About the Book and Editors 209
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