A History of Developmental Psychology in Autobiography

By Dennis Thompson; John D. Hogano | Go to book overview

from a fractionated to an integrated status that has potential to optimize human functioning in the everyday context ( Wapner, 1992, 1995).


Notes

I express my deep appreciation to L. G. Wapner and J. Demick for their constructive comments on an early draft of the manuscript.

1.
The approach is an extension -- elaborated conceptualization and increased range of empirical study -- of the organismic -- developmental perspective ( Werner, 1957b) that evolved from Werner's ( 1926) classic work on comparative development, Werner and Kaplan's ( 1963) work on symbol formation and related problems ( Werner & Kaplan, 1956), and my work with Werner and others on sensory-tonic field theory of perception (e.g., Werner & Wapner, 1949, 1952, 1956; Wapner, Cirillo & Baker, 1969, 1971) and on perceptual development (e.g., Wapner & Werner, 1957).
2.
See Dewsbury's ( 1993) recent article describing the controversy that developed following Maier's receipt of the AAAS award.
3.
Including Jim Klee, Jane Shohl, Irwin Berg, Urie Bronfenbrenner, Harold Guetzkow, Raoul Weisman, Estefania Aldaba, and Tooi Xoomsai.
4.
Ted Berlin and Bill Sleator (physics/chemistry), Esther Sleator (medicine), Julie Yourigner and Herman Lichtstein (bacteriology), William Dusenbury (economics), Leonard "Jimmy" Savage and Sammy Eilenberg (mathematics), and Jane Savage (anthropology).
5.
For biographic material on and descriptions of the works of this truly outstanding scholar of international stature, who broke new ground in developmental psychology and carried out programmatic research in diverse areas of psychology, including language, perception, aesthetic experience, and mental retardation and who wrote critically on broad conceptual and methodological issues, see Barten & Franklin, 1978; Glick, 1983, 1992; Kaplan & Wapner, 1960; Wapner & Kaplan, 1966a, 1966b; Witkin, 1965.
6.
In 1943, Werner left Wayne County Training School, where he had completed an extensive program of research on mental retardation, for a teaching position at Brooklyn College. Our work in perception was initiated there in 1946, when I joined the faculty.
7.
For example, functional equivalence (that various forms of stimulation have similar perceptual end-effects) and the summative hypothesis (simultaneous introduction of two or more functionally equivalent factors operate coactively or summatively.). As to the former, evidence has been accumulated for various aspects of space perception (see Werner & Wapner, 1952, 1956); relevant to the latter is the study by Meisel & Wapner ( 1969).
8.
The research program on the sensory-tonic field theory of perception was supported by NIMH Research Grant MH #00348 for twenty-four years and produced more than 100 publications, approximately 40 Ph.D. dissertations, 50 M.A. theses, and 150 papers presented at professional meetings. Along with completing theses and dissertations, many graduate students with other involvements in advancing the research program included: Harvey Baker, Mel Barton, Martin Bauermeister, Jan Bruell, Ken Chandler, Len Cirillo, Frank Clarkson, Bruce Denner, Joe Glick, Anna Guyette, Don Krus, Jonas Langer, Bob Liebert, Joe McFarland, Al Mehrabian, Paul Meisel, Arnie Miller, Ric Morant, Tom Mulholland, Sonoko Ohwaki, George Rand, Jerry Schlater, Csaba Sziklai, and Leon Teft.

-199-

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A History of Developmental Psychology in Autobiography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • References x
  • 1 - Louise Bates Ames 1
  • Notes 21
  • References 21
  • 2 - James Emmett Birren 24
  • References 44
  • 3 - Marie Skodak Crissey 46
  • Notes 69
  • Representative Publications 69
  • 4 - David Elkind 71
  • References 83
  • 5 - Dale B. Harris 84
  • References 103
  • 6 - Lois Wladis Hoffman 105
  • References 119
  • 7 - Çiǧdem KaǧitçebaŞi 121
  • Notes 133
  • Representative Publications 133
  • 8 - Lewis P. Lipsitt 137
  • References 158
  • 9 - Paul Mussen 161
  • References 177
  • 10 - Seymour Wapner 180
  • Notes 199
  • References 199
  • About the Book and Editors 209
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