Psychological Processes and Advertising Effects: Theory, Research, and Applications

By Linda F. Alwitt; Andrew A. Mitchell | Go to book overview

In summary, we believe that the theory and research presented here can be used to address the paradoxical nature of much of the existing literature pertaining to the relationship between memory and judgment. The conceptual distinction between retrieval and computational processes has already proved to be extremely useful in understanding the nature of this relationship, and we believe that it will continue to be useful in future work. It is hoped that the theory presented gives advertisers some insight into the conditions under which they can expect to find a strong correspondence between memory and judgment. It is equally important for them to also be able to identify, based upon theoretical considerations, those conditions under which such a strong correspondence should not be expected.


REFERENCES

Allen, G. A., Mahler, W. A., & Estes, W. K. ( 1969). Effects of recall tests on long term retention of paired associates. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 8, 463-470.

Anderson, N. H., & Hubert, S. ( 1963). Effects of concomitant verbal recall on order effects in personality impression formation. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 2, 379-391.

Asch, S. E. ( 1946). Forming impressions of personality. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 41, 258-290.

Belmore, S. M. ( 1981). Imagery and semantic elaboration in hypermnesia for words. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Learning and Memory, 7, 191-203.

Bettman, J. R. ( 1979). An information processing theory of consumer choice. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.

Brucks, M., & Mitchell, A. ( 1981). Knowledge structures, production systems, and decision strategies. Advances in Consumer Research, 8, 750-757.

Burke, R. ( 1980). A preliminary model of consumer cognition. Unpublished manuscript, University of Florida, Center for Consumer Research, Gainesville.

Carlston, D. E. ( 1980a). Events, inferences, and impression formation. In R. Hastie, T. M. Ostrom , E. B. Ebbesen, R. S. Wyer, D. L. Hamilton, & D. E. Carlston (Eds.), Person memory: The cognitive basis of social perception. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 89-119.

Carlston, D. E. ( 1980b). The recall and use of observed behavioral episodes and inferred traits in social inference processes. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 16, 779-804.

Dreben, E. K., Fiske, S. T., & Hastie, R. ( 1979). The independence of item and evaluative information: Impression and recall order effects in behavior-based impression formation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 37, 1758- 1768.

Erdelyi, M., & Kleinbard, J. ( 1978). Has Ebbingbaus decayed with time? The growth of recall (hypermnesia) over days. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Learning and Memory, 4, 275-289.

Fiske, S. T. ( 1981). Social cognition and affect. In J. H. Harvey (Ed.), Cognition, social behavior, and the environment. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Fiske, S. T. ( 1982). Schema-triggered affect: Applications to social perception. In M. S. Clark & S. T. Fiske (Eds.), Affect and cognition. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 55-78.

Fiske, S. T., Kenny, D. A., & Taylor, S. E. ( 1982). Structural models for the mediation of salience effects on attribution. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 18, 105-127.

-126-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Psychological Processes and Advertising Effects: Theory, Research, and Applications
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 305

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.