Psychological Processes and Advertising Effects: Theory, Research, and Applications

By Linda F. Alwitt; Andrew A. Mitchell | Go to book overview
4. Higher levels of abstraction cannot be incorporated into traditional attitude models as consumers cannot properly assign importance weights across different content categories. Because these critical content areas cannot be incorporated into attitude research, one must question the validity of these traditional models.

Understanding consumers and the basis of their decision-making strategies is essential to developing strategies and to developing effective communications. To understand the decision-making process, we must identify the cognitive structures that are brought to bear during the decision. This entails, from a means-end chain perspective, knowledge of how personal values interrelate with important consequences of consumption to provide the continuing motivation for consumer behavior.


REFERENCES

Gutman, J. ( 1982). A means-end chain model based on consumer categorization processes. Journal of Marketing, 46, ( Spring), 60-72.

Gutman, J., & Reynolds, T. J. ( 1979). An investigation of the levels of cognitive abstraction utilized by consumers in product differentiation. In J. Eighmey (Ed.), Attitude research under the sun. Chicago: American Marketing Association, 128-150.

Howard, J. ( 1977). Consumer behavior: Application and theory. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Kendall, M. G. ( 1955). Rank correlation method. London: Griffin.

Olson, J. C., & Reynolds, T. J. ( 1983). Understanding consumers' cognitive structures: Implications for advertising strategy. In L. Percy & A. G. Woodside (Eds.), Advertising and Consumer Psychology. Lexington Books, 77-90.

Reynolds, T. J. ( 1983). A non-metric approach to determine the differentiating power of attribute ratings with respect to pairwise similarity judgments. American Marketing Association Educator's Conference. Sarasota, Florida.

Reynolds, T. J., & Cliff, N. ( 1983). True ordinal regression. International Psychometric Meetings. Paris, France.

Young, S., & Feigin, B. ( 1975). Using the benefit chain for improved strategy formulation. Journal of Marketing, (July), 72-74.

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