Elementary School Organization and Administration

By Henry J. Otto | Go to book overview

4
General Features of Elementary-School Organization

THEORETICALLY THE ORGANIZATION of a school is the administrative expression of educational theory. Organization may be viewed as the structure or the framework within which teachers, pupils, supervisors, and others operate to carry on the activities of the school. Theoretically this structure should vary according to the differences in educational theory underlying the objectives, curriculum, and method. One might reasonably assume that the organization or framework within which teachers and pupils operate would be different in a school accepting the organismic view of learning, the child development view of the curriculum, and the experimental philosophy of education than it would be in a school professing rather singular reliance upon the stimulus-response theory of learning, the subject-matter view of the curriculum, and idealism as a guiding philosophy. The function of organization is to set the stage and to facilitate the application in the classroom of the kind of education one desires for children and the method whereby children may get it.

In theory one may accept the statements in the preceding paragraph. As one studies current practice one becomes aware that the spirit may be willing but the flesh is weak. There are many obstacles which hinder school people in achieving perfect harmony between the accepted educational theory and the organization of the school. One may be convinced of the continuous nature of child growth and development, but the school has not yet achieved an organization which permits continuous pupil progress because teachers may not have had the time or opportunity to acquire competence in handling the teaching process essential for continuous pupil progress; instructional supplies may be inadequate, or classes too large. Conventionalism acquired through long years of usage may be slow in dissolving, or certain dominant personalities may adhere to educational viewpoints which are not in harmony with the viewpoints held by a majority of the teachers. It is because of these or other possible reasons that the typical elementary school at a given time presents such a curious mixture of educational theories and organizational features. Frequently this curious mixture of theories and practices contains many actual contradictions. Inconsistencies between educational theory and organizational practices are

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Elementary School Organization and Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Editor's Introduction v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • 1 - Elementary Education in Transition 1
  • Selected Bibliography 36
  • 2 - The Role of the Elementary School 37
  • Selected Bibliography 77
  • 3 - Curriculum Issues 78
  • Selected Bibliography 124
  • 4 - General Features Of Elementary-School Organization 127
  • Selected Bibliography 164
  • 5 - Grouping Children For Wholesome Development 165
  • Selected Bibliography 220
  • 6 - Children's Progress Through the School 221
  • Selected Bibliography 286
  • 7 - Organization for Instruction 287
  • Selected Bibliography 319
  • 8 - Organization for Supervision 320
  • Selected Bibliography 351
  • 9 - Pupil Personnel Services 353
  • Selected Bibliography 403
  • 10 - Library Service 404
  • Selected Bibliography 437
  • 11 - Protection and Promotion Of Children's Health 438
  • Selected Bibliography 483
  • 12 - Educational Provisions For Exceptional Children 485
  • Selected Bibliography 537
  • 13 - The School in Its Community At Mid-Century 539
  • Selected Bibliography 581
  • 14 - Provisions for Administering The School 583
  • Clearing-House for Details Of School Operation 610
  • 15 - School-Plant Trends 612
  • Selected Bibliography 650
  • 16 - The Professional Elementary-School Principal 652
  • Selected Bibliography 691
  • Appendix 693
  • Index 715
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