Elementary School Organization and Administration

By Henry J. Otto | Go to book overview

10
Library Service

THE NEED FOR good library service in a modern elementary school is no longer an issue for debate. All thinking people who are informed about the purposes of education, the nature of the learning process, and the curriculum and instructional procedures in today's elementary schools are agreed on the important contribution which library service makes to the character and quality of the educational program. Schools that have good library service usually have better instructional programs than those without library service. Schools without at least a respectable amount of library service usually have narrow and somewhat barren curricula. In a sense, the nature and scope of library service is an index to the character and quality of the curriculum and instruction.

A brief historical sketch of the development of library service in elementary schools was given in Chapter 1. The present status of library work in elementary schools is difficult to ascertain. In 1948 the U. S. Office of Education sent an inquiry on school libraries to the superintendents of 8097 school administrative units in the United States. Usable replies were received from only 1037 of them. Many of those who did reply said that their elementary schools had no library service or that their own records did not provide the kinds of data requested. There is no way of knowing whether the 7060 who did not reply had no libraries or merely lacked the essential information about their libraries. Perhaps the former cause was operative in the majority of cases. At any rate it seems safe to conclude that country-wide elementary schools have a long way to go before it can be said that adequate library service is the rule rather than the exception. In the administrative units represented by the 1037 replies to the 1948 inquiry, the percentage of elementary schools served by centralized libraries ranged from 15.1 in the counties to 40.5 in cities with 2500 to 9999 population (Table 29). Even in the largest cities in the United States less than half of the elementary schools had centralized libraries.1 The problem is even more acute in rural areas since public library service

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1
Nora E. Beust and others, "Statistics of Public-School Libraries, 1947-48", Biennial Survey of Education in the United States, 1946-48 ( Washington, Federal Security Agency, U. S. Office of Education, 1950), Ch. 8.

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Elementary School Organization and Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Editor's Introduction v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • 1 - Elementary Education in Transition 1
  • Selected Bibliography 36
  • 2 - The Role of the Elementary School 37
  • Selected Bibliography 77
  • 3 - Curriculum Issues 78
  • Selected Bibliography 124
  • 4 - General Features Of Elementary-School Organization 127
  • Selected Bibliography 164
  • 5 - Grouping Children For Wholesome Development 165
  • Selected Bibliography 220
  • 6 - Children's Progress Through the School 221
  • Selected Bibliography 286
  • 7 - Organization for Instruction 287
  • Selected Bibliography 319
  • 8 - Organization for Supervision 320
  • Selected Bibliography 351
  • 9 - Pupil Personnel Services 353
  • Selected Bibliography 403
  • 10 - Library Service 404
  • Selected Bibliography 437
  • 11 - Protection and Promotion Of Children's Health 438
  • Selected Bibliography 483
  • 12 - Educational Provisions For Exceptional Children 485
  • Selected Bibliography 537
  • 13 - The School in Its Community At Mid-Century 539
  • Selected Bibliography 581
  • 14 - Provisions for Administering The School 583
  • Clearing-House for Details Of School Operation 610
  • 15 - School-Plant Trends 612
  • Selected Bibliography 650
  • 16 - The Professional Elementary-School Principal 652
  • Selected Bibliography 691
  • Appendix 693
  • Index 715
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