Literacy: An International Handbook

By Daniel A. Wagner; Richard L. Venezky et al. | Go to book overview

Literacy:
An International
Handbook

Edited by
Daniel A. Wagner
Richard L. Venezky
Brian V. Street

Westview Press
A Member of the Perseus Books Group

-iii-

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Literacy: An International Handbook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • 1 - Rationales, Debates, and New Directions: an Introduction 1
  • Part One - Historical and Philosophical Roots 9
  • 2 - the History of Reading 11
  • References 15
  • 3 - Literacy in Social History 16
  • Conclusion 20
  • References 20
  • 4 - Languages and Scripts in Contact: Historical Perspectives 22
  • References 27
  • 5 - the Implications of Literacy 29
  • References 33
  • 6 - the Meanings of Literacy 34
  • Conclusions 39
  • References 39
  • Part Two - Psychological Approaches 41
  • 7 - Children's Reading Acquisition 43
  • References 48
  • 8 - Adult Reading Acquisition 49
  • References 53
  • 9 - Reading Disability 54
  • References 58
  • 10 - Diagnosis and Remediation in Reading 60
  • Conclusion 66
  • References 66
  • 11 - Diagnosis and Remediation in Writing Development 68
  • Conclusions 73
  • References 73
  • 12 - Metacognitive Aspects of Literacy 74
  • Conclusions 78
  • References 79
  • 13 - Literacy and Cognition 81
  • Conclusions 84
  • References 85
  • Part Three - Sociological and Anthropological Approaches 87
  • 14 - Sociological and Anthropological Issues in Literacy 89
  • Conclusion 93
  • References 94
  • 15 - Ethnic and Minority Issues in Literacy 95
  • References 100
  • 16 - Literacy and Social Practice 102
  • References 105
  • 17 - Ethnography of Writing 107
  • References 111
  • 18 - Literacy and Religion: the Word, the Holy Word, and the World 113
  • Conclusion 117
  • References 118
  • 19 - Reading, Writing, and Salvation: the Impact of Christian Missionaries on Literacy 119
  • Conclusions 124
  • References 124
  • Part Four - Language and Literacy 125
  • 20 - Orality and Literacy 127
  • References 131
  • 21 - Literacy and Language Development 132
  • References 135
  • 22 - Development of Orthographies 137
  • References 141
  • 23 - Second Language Reading 143
  • Conclusions 146
  • References 147
  • 24 - Cross-Language Transfer of Reading Skills 148
  • Summary 152
  • References 153
  • 25 - Metalinguistic Awareness and Literacy Acquisition in Different Languages 155
  • References 159
  • Part Five - Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment 161
  • 26 - Models of Reading 163
  • References 165
  • 27 - Theoretical Approaches to Reading Instruction 167
  • References 171
  • 28 - Adult Education and Literacy 173
  • References 178
  • 29 - Cognitive Perspectives on Primers and Textbooks 179
  • Concluding Thoughts 184
  • References 184
  • 30 - Social Perspectives on Primers and Textbooks 186
  • References 190
  • 31 - Comprehension of Printed Instructions 192
  • Conclusions 197
  • References 197
  • 32 - Literacy Skill Retention 199
  • Conclusion 201
  • References 201
  • 33 - Alternative Assessments of Learning and Literacy: a U.S. Perspective 203
  • References 208
  • 34 - International and Comparative Assessment of Literacy 210
  • References 216
  • 35 - International Adult Literacy Household Survey Methods 217
  • Conclusions 222
  • References 222
  • Part Six - Numeracy 225
  • 36 - Links Between Literacy and Numeracy 227
  • Conclusions 230
  • References 230
  • 37 - Indigenous Number Systems 232
  • Conclusion 235
  • References 235
  • 38 - Children's Acquisition of Mathematics 237
  • Conclusion 241
  • References 241
  • 39 - Adult Numeracy 242
  • References 246
  • Part Seven - Policy Perspectives 249
  • 40 - Home Influences on Early Literacy 251
  • Conclusions 256
  • References 257
  • 41 - Family Literacy Practice and Programs 258
  • References 263
  • 42 - Social Policy in Support of Literacy 265
  • References 269
  • 43 - Gender and Literacy Development 271
  • References 276
  • 44 - Language and Literacy Planning 277
  • References 281
  • 45 - Indigenous Education and Literacy Learning 283
  • Conclusion 286
  • References 287
  • 46 - Literacy Campaigns: a Policy Perspective 288
  • References 292
  • 47 - The Effect of Education on Health 294
  • Conclusions 298
  • References 298
  • 48 - Literacy and Population Change 300
  • References 304
  • 49 - Literacy and Basic Education 306
  • Conclusions 309
  • References 310
  • 50 - Literacy, Skills, and Work 311
  • References 316
  • 51 - Literacy and Older Adults 318
  • References 322
  • 52 - Literacy and Nonformal Education: Overlap and Divergence 324
  • References 328
  • 53 - Staff Training and Development for Adult Literacy 329
  • Conclusion 335
  • References 336
  • 54 - Post-Literacy Materials 337
  • Conclusions 341
  • References 341
  • 55 - Literacy and Economic Development 342
  • References 346
  • 56 - Literacy from a Donor Perspective 348
  • References 352
  • 57 - Literacy and International Policy Development 353
  • References 358
  • 58 - Investing in Adult Literacy: Lessons and Implications 360
  • Summary 365
  • References 366
  • 59 - Adult Literacy in Developing Countries: a Contemporary Annotated Bibliography 367
  • Part Eight - Contemporary Regional Perspectives 379
  • 60 - Literacy in North America 381
  • References 384
  • 61 - Literacy in Europe 385
  • Conclusion 389
  • References 390
  • 62 - Literacy in Russia and the Former USSR 391
  • References 395
  • 63 - Literacy in Scandinavia 396
  • References 399
  • 64 - Literacy in the Arab Region 400
  • Conclusions 403
  • References 403
  • 65 - Literacy in Francophone West Africa 405
  • References 409
  • 66 - Literacy in English-Speaking Africa 410
  • Conclusions 413
  • References 413
  • 67 - Adult Literacy Experiences in Lusophone African Countries 414
  • References 417
  • 68 - Literacy in South Africa 418
  • References 421
  • 69 - Literacy in China, Korea, and Japan 423
  • Conclusions 427
  • References 428
  • 70 - Literacy in South Central Asia 429
  • References 433
  • 71 - Adult Literacy in India: Assumptions and Implications 434
  • References 439
  • 72 - Literacy Education in New Zealand and Australia 440
  • Conclusion 442
  • References 443
  • 73 - Literacy in Mexico and Central America 444
  • Conclusions 446
  • References 447
  • 74 - Literacy in Brazil and South America 448
  • Conclusions 451
  • References 451
  • 75 - Literacy in the Pacific Islands 452
  • References 454
  • Part Nine - Literacy and New Technologies 455
  • 76 - Information Technologies and the Future of the Book 457
  • References 461
  • 77 - Information Technologies and Literacy 462
  • References 468
  • 78 - Assisting Literacy Through Distance Education 469
  • References 474
  • 79 - Literacy, Electronic Networking, and the Internet 475
  • References 480
  • About the Contributors 483
  • Author Index 493
  • Subject Index 505
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