Children of the Cultural Revolution: Family Life and Political Behavior in Mao's China

By Xiaowei Zang | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
Hong Yung Lee, The Politics of the Cultural Revolution ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1978); Stanley Rosen, Red Guard Factionalism and the Cultural Revolution in Guangzhou ( Boulder: Westview Press, 1982); Jonathan Unger, The Class System in Rural China. Pp. 121-141 in James L. Watson (ed.) Class and Social Stratification in Post-Revolution China ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984); Gordon White, The Politics of Class and Class Origins ( Contemporary China Centre, The Australian National University, 1974); Lynn White, Politics of Chaos ( Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1989).
2.
Lee 1978 (footnote 1); Rosen 1982 (footnote 1); Unger 1984 (footnote 1); White 1974 (footnote 1).
3.
John Dollard, Caste and Class in a Southern Town ( New York: Doubleday, 1957); Stephen Fuchs, Children of Hari ( Vienna: Verlag Herold, 1950).
4.
Unger 1984 (footnote 1), p. 126.
5.
See Chapter 2 for the class-labeling campaign in the early 1950s.
6.
Andrew Walder, Communist Neo-Traditionalism ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1986), Pp. 91-92.
7.
Walder 1986 (footnote 6).
8.
Interviews.
9.
Richard Kraus, Class Conflict in Chinese Socialism ( New York: Columbia University Press, 1981); Watson 1984 (footnote 1); White 1974 (footnote 1).
10.
Mayfair Mei-hui Yang, Gifts, Favors, and Banquets ( Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994), p. 186.
11.
E. W. Bakke, Citizens without Work ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1940); Glen H. Elder, Children of the Great Depression ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974).
12.
Elder 1974 (footnote 11); also see L. Thara Bhai, Changing Patterns of Caste & Class Relations in South India ( Delhi: Gian Publishing House, 1987); Bakke 1940 (footnote 11); Allison Davis and John Dollard, Children of Bondage ( New York: Harper Touchbooks, 1964); Dollard 1957 (footnote 3); A. K. Srivastava, Social Class and Family Life in India ( Allahabad: Chugn Publication, 1986).

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Children of the Cultural Revolution: Family Life and Political Behavior in Mao's China
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 10
  • 2 - The Political Status System 13
  • Notes 20
  • 3 - Job Ranking and Social Classes 23
  • Notes 38
  • 4 - Class and Caste 41
  • Notes 47
  • 5 - Family Life and Political Behavior in Pre-1966 China 49
  • Notes 61
  • 6 - The Upper Caste Middle Class 63
  • Notes 80
  • 7 - The Upper Caste Lower Class 82
  • Notes 90
  • 8 - The Lower Caste 91
  • Notes 102
  • 9 - Class, Caste and Political Behavior in China 103
  • Notes 110
  • Appendix Notes on Methodology 112
  • Notes 118
  • Bibliography 119
  • Index 129
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