A Question of Discipline: Pedagogy, Power, and the Teaching of Cultural Studies

By Joyce E. Canaan; Debbie Epstein | Go to book overview

concerned with questions of hierarchical observation and the normalizing gaze ( Foucault, 1977), though from somewhat different perspectives. Canaan is interested in the normalizing gaze which students and faculty turn on each other and, in particular, how systems of examination and grading reinforce the disciplinary practices we adopt. Steinberg focuses more on questions of marginality for inter-disciplines like Cultural Studies and Women's Studies and the disciplinary gaze of the institutions of the academy on them. Her conclusion, however, is not a call for centralizing Cultural Studies and Women's Studies within the academy. Rather, she is interested in the subversive power that marginalization brings. Epstein's article bears similarities to both Steinberg's and Canaan's. Like Steinberg, Epstein is concerned to explore questions of expertise, authorship, and speech; like Canaan, Epstein is focused on the question of the pedagogic practices involved in lecturing.

Deborah Lynn Steinberg's chapter brings the book to a close with the evocative sentence, 'I figure that if "home" makes me a stranger, making "home" strange is the least I can do'. In a way, this summarises what we have attempted to do in this book. Teaching Cultural Studies (that study of everyday lived experiences) constitutes the day-to-day existence of the contributors to this book. In turning our gaze upon our own lived experiences as teachers in the academy, and making it strange, it is our belief that we can illuminate the experiences of others, involved in the academy as students and/or teachers, especially those who have a commitment to the development of 'really useful (or subversive) knowledge'.


Notes
1.
Hence the widespread use in the United States, especially in wealthy Ivy League universities, of poorly paid graduate students as Teaching Assistants to relieve the faculty of much of the detailed labour of teaching: seminars, tutorials, pastoral work, and setting and grading essays. This is less practised in the poorer institutions of the UK and Australia, but it is a growing trend.
2.
A balti is a type of north Indian food that is widely available in Birmingham.
3.
See, for example, Ellsworth, 1989; hooks, 1994; Lather, 1991; Walkerdine, 1990. Cultural Studies in the UK is gaining awareness of the importance of pedagogical issues in the UK, as indicated by the March 1996 conference 'Teaching Culture and the Cultures of Teaching' ( University of Sussex).
5.
Joyce initially approached Debbie with the idea of co-editing a book on Cultural Studies methodologies. In discussion about this, we decided that we wanted to focus on questions of pedagogy, especially as this was a particular interest of Debbie's (who had been a primary school teacher for nearly twenty years before becoming an academic and who also had research interests in pedagogy).

-9-

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A Question of Discipline: Pedagogy, Power, and the Teaching of Cultural Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • 1 - Questions of Discipline/ Disciplining Cultural Studies 1
  • Notes 9
  • References 10
  • 2 - Theory, Area Studies, Cultural Studies: Issues of Pedagogy in Multiculturalism 11
  • Notes 23
  • References 25
  • 3 - Doing Cultural Studies in Colleges of Education 27
  • Notes 39
  • References 40
  • 4 - Teaching Without Guarantees: Cultural Studies, Pedagogy, and Identity 42
  • Notes 69
  • References 71
  • 5 - 'It Ain't like Any Other Teaching': Some Versions of Teaching Cultural Studies 74
  • Notes 93
  • References 95
  • 6 - Mediating Desire: Visual Representation, Power, and Informed Consent in Teaching Feminist Cultural Studies 97
  • Notes 115
  • References 115
  • 7 - Teaching/Cultural Studies (or Pedagogy for 'World'-Travellers/ 'World'-Travelling Pedagogy) 117
  • Notes 128
  • References 128
  • 8 - Mirrors, Paintings, and Romances 131
  • Notes 151
  • References 154
  • 9 - Examining the Examination: Tracing the Effects of Pedagogic Authority on Cultural Studies Lecturers and Students 157
  • Notes 175
  • References 177
  • 10 - The Voice of Authority: on Lecturing in Cultural Studies 178
  • Notes 189
  • References 191
  • 11 - All Roads Lead to . . . Problems with Discipline 192
  • Notes 201
  • References 203
  • About the Book and Editors 205
  • About the Contributors 206
  • Index 208
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