A Question of Discipline: Pedagogy, Power, and the Teaching of Cultural Studies

By Joyce E. Canaan; Debbie Epstein | Go to book overview

education can translate programs for prospective and existing teachers into sites for developing and expanding the narratives of public service while simultaneously developing among their students the capacities for critical agency and self-definition. Given the circumstances in which public schooling and colleges of education find themselves, Cultural Studies offers a challenge that few educators can afford to ignore.


Notes
1.
I take this issue up in detail in Giroux ( 1988, 1993).
2.
This is taken up in Smith ( 1994: 64-73).
3.
The literature on this issue is too abundant to repeat here, but examples can be found in Bartolome ( 1994); Fine ( 1991); Aronowitz and Giroux ( 1993); Macedo ( 1994); and Brady ( 1995).
4.
For representative example of the diverse issues taken up in the field of Cultural Studies, see Grossberg, Nelson, and Treichler ( 1992); and During ( 1993).
5.
The relationship between Cultural Studies and relations of government are taken up in Bennett ( 1992).
6.
The notion of globalization as a space of struggle is taken from Grossberg ( 1996). See also Hall ( 1993).
7.
I take up these issues in more detail in Giroux ( 1992, 1994).
8.
For a history of Cultural Studies in the United States and England, see Aronowitz ( 1993); also see Grossberg ( 1993: 21-66). For a shorter analysis, see the "Introduction" to Cultural Studies ( Nelson, Treichler, and Grossberg 1992) and Hall ( 1992:277-286).
9.
Anyone who has been following the culture wars of the last eight years is well aware of the conservative agenda for reordering public and higher education around the commercial goal of promoting economic growth for the nation while simultaneously supporting the values of Western civilization as a common culture designed to undermine the ravages of calls for equity and multiculturalism. For a brilliant analysis of the conservative attack on higher education, see Messer-Davidow ( 1993).
10.
For an example of this, see Solomon ( 1993:11-18).
11.
This issue is taken up in Aronowitz and Giroux ( 1993), especially in the introduction, 'Beyond the Melting Pot -- Schooling in the Twenty-first Century'.
12.
Gilroy ( 1993: 9, 15) is very instructive on this point. He writes: 'There is a plea here that further enquiries should be made into precisely how discussions of "race," beauty, ethnicity, and culture have contributed to the critical thinking that eventually gave rise to cultural studies. . . . The emphatically national character ascribed to the concept of modes of production (cultural and otherwise) is another fundamental question which demonstrates the ethnohistorical specificity of dominant approaches to cultural politics, social movements, and oppositional consciousness. . . . I want to develop the suggestion that cultural historians could take the Atlantic as one single, complex unity of analysis in their discussions of the modern world and use it to produce an explicitly transnational and intercultural perspective'.

-39-

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A Question of Discipline: Pedagogy, Power, and the Teaching of Cultural Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • 1 - Questions of Discipline/ Disciplining Cultural Studies 1
  • Notes 9
  • References 10
  • 2 - Theory, Area Studies, Cultural Studies: Issues of Pedagogy in Multiculturalism 11
  • Notes 23
  • References 25
  • 3 - Doing Cultural Studies in Colleges of Education 27
  • Notes 39
  • References 40
  • 4 - Teaching Without Guarantees: Cultural Studies, Pedagogy, and Identity 42
  • Notes 69
  • References 71
  • 5 - 'It Ain't like Any Other Teaching': Some Versions of Teaching Cultural Studies 74
  • Notes 93
  • References 95
  • 6 - Mediating Desire: Visual Representation, Power, and Informed Consent in Teaching Feminist Cultural Studies 97
  • Notes 115
  • References 115
  • 7 - Teaching/Cultural Studies (or Pedagogy for 'World'-Travellers/ 'World'-Travelling Pedagogy) 117
  • Notes 128
  • References 128
  • 8 - Mirrors, Paintings, and Romances 131
  • Notes 151
  • References 154
  • 9 - Examining the Examination: Tracing the Effects of Pedagogic Authority on Cultural Studies Lecturers and Students 157
  • Notes 175
  • References 177
  • 10 - The Voice of Authority: on Lecturing in Cultural Studies 178
  • Notes 189
  • References 191
  • 11 - All Roads Lead to . . . Problems with Discipline 192
  • Notes 201
  • References 203
  • About the Book and Editors 205
  • About the Contributors 206
  • Index 208
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