A Question of Discipline: Pedagogy, Power, and the Teaching of Cultural Studies

By Joyce E. Canaan; Debbie Epstein | Go to book overview

The truth is, I don't think you ever stop learning as a teacher, as a teacher without guarantees. Is this because there are so many lessons that go beyond pedagogy, beyond skills of teaching, too?


Notes
1.
Significantly, it was the approach of the editors of this volume that set me working on teaching as a topic, though I was already reviewing the Birmingham experience in other ways. I am grateful for the stimulus of their questions and their help and friendship. Thanks also to one-time colleagues and students at Birmingham whose particular contributions are cited below as appropriate. I gained much from giving versions of this chapter to the conference 'Teaching Culture, Cultures of Teaching' at Sussex University 23/24 March 1996 and to a staff/ student colloquium at the Institute for European Ethnology at the Humboldt University of Berlin. I have also written in detail about experiences at the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies, but from a more explicitly political angle, in Long (forthcoming).
2.
I have concentrated here on the course work elements in the Masters programme. Students also worked with (and without) staff in small research-andreading groups and in one-to-one tutorial work, especially around projects and a dissertation. I hope to write on another occasion about both group work and tutorial/ supervision experiences.
3.
There are few records of earlier periods left at the department itself. I have relied upon my own 'archive'. I kept my own teaching materials, records of the sub-groups I was in, and key documents in CCCS debates.
4.
I am grateful, honestly, to Mariette Clare for this comment.
5.
Charlotte Brunsdon, correspondence, 29 Sept. 1995.
6.
It is interesting that these texts -- not a complete list, for course -- all come from debates about critical pedagogy in the United States; also that several of them deal with racism and black/ white relations in this context. The feminist influence is also very important. For references for debates on 'emancipatory pedagogy' in the United States, see McNeil in this volume.
7.
I am especially grateful to Lucy Bland, Charlotte Brunsdon, Mariette Clare, Jean Duruz, Michael Green, Rozena Maart, and Klaartje Schweizer for discussions or written comments. Both of the editors of this volume studied and taught at CCCS/ DCS, and their experiences formed their comments on my draft. In subsequent work on these themes I plan to consult more widely, with a possible, poly-vocal follow up to this essay.
8.
Jean Duruz, correspondence, 20 Sept. 1995.
9.
As an institution, Oxford Brookes University in Britain has made something of a specialism in education development in Higher Education. I have earned a lot from practical and theoretical dialogues with members of the Educational Studies field there. I am grateful for being able to be involved for four years in their exemplary practices as an external examiner (and occasional teacher).
10.
Jean Duruz, correspondence, 29 Sept. 1995.
11.
Klaartje Schweizer, correspondence, 19 Nov. 1995.

-69-

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A Question of Discipline: Pedagogy, Power, and the Teaching of Cultural Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • 1 - Questions of Discipline/ Disciplining Cultural Studies 1
  • Notes 9
  • References 10
  • 2 - Theory, Area Studies, Cultural Studies: Issues of Pedagogy in Multiculturalism 11
  • Notes 23
  • References 25
  • 3 - Doing Cultural Studies in Colleges of Education 27
  • Notes 39
  • References 40
  • 4 - Teaching Without Guarantees: Cultural Studies, Pedagogy, and Identity 42
  • Notes 69
  • References 71
  • 5 - 'It Ain't like Any Other Teaching': Some Versions of Teaching Cultural Studies 74
  • Notes 93
  • References 95
  • 6 - Mediating Desire: Visual Representation, Power, and Informed Consent in Teaching Feminist Cultural Studies 97
  • Notes 115
  • References 115
  • 7 - Teaching/Cultural Studies (or Pedagogy for 'World'-Travellers/ 'World'-Travelling Pedagogy) 117
  • Notes 128
  • References 128
  • 8 - Mirrors, Paintings, and Romances 131
  • Notes 151
  • References 154
  • 9 - Examining the Examination: Tracing the Effects of Pedagogic Authority on Cultural Studies Lecturers and Students 157
  • Notes 175
  • References 177
  • 10 - The Voice of Authority: on Lecturing in Cultural Studies 178
  • Notes 189
  • References 191
  • 11 - All Roads Lead to . . . Problems with Discipline 192
  • Notes 201
  • References 203
  • About the Book and Editors 205
  • About the Contributors 206
  • Index 208
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