A Question of Discipline: Pedagogy, Power, and the Teaching of Cultural Studies

By Joyce E. Canaan; Debbie Epstein | Go to book overview

truth. For me, this pedagogy implies a responsibility on the part of teachers and students to generate tentative, partial, and context-specific understandings of issues and events and to recover the connections between the personal, the educational, the political, and the theoretical.

I think it is fair to say that over the years I have taught 'Constructions of Gender in the Media', I have received at least one complaint each semester from someone in class who was 'offended', 'disturbed', 'violated', or 'angry' about a text used in class. This has ranged from frustration over the pornography presentation described earlier, to my assigning Carol Clover book Men, Women, and Chainsaws ('I don't watch horror films; why should I have to read about them?'), to anger at screening Marlon Rigg Tongues Untied ('Why does he say that Black men loving Black men is the revolutionary act? Where does that leave me as a lesbian?'). There is no unproblematic text as far as my class and my students go. If everything goes well, classes are full of the 'unusual and unexpected'. Cultural Studies approaches provides ways for teachers and students to see ourselves differently, to be together differently, and to construct knowledge differently 'in' and 'out' of the classroom. I encourage students to examine everything they can get their hands on, to investigate their pleasures, and to analyze their responses. Cultural Studies provides me with pedagogical frameworks for directly engaging with the 'pedagogical moments' of classrooms rather than contributing to their further denial and repression.


Notes
My thanks to Norman Clark at the University of Iowa for providing me with information on the Iowa Classroom Materials Policy and the response by the Campaign for Academic Freedom. Thanks also to Stacy Wolf for bringing the Women's Studies List Consent Form to my attention.

References

"Consent Form For Courses Using Sexually Explicit Material" ( 1993) www/http: WMST-L@UMDD.BITNET. No. 28 (October 15).

Ellsworth, Elizabeth ( 1993) "Unpublished Course Syllabus". University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Fallow, Jean ( 1994) "Q and A on the Classroom Materials Policy". Unpublished Pamphlet Produced for the Campaign for Academic Freedom. University of Iowa.

Lather, Patti ( 1991) Getting Smart: Feminist Research and Pedagogy With/In the Postmodern. New York: Routledge.

Leatherman, Courtney ( 1993) "Dealing with Sexual Images in Iowa Classrooms". The Chronicle of Higher Education 40 (December 8): A22.

-115-

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A Question of Discipline: Pedagogy, Power, and the Teaching of Cultural Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • 1 - Questions of Discipline/ Disciplining Cultural Studies 1
  • Notes 9
  • References 10
  • 2 - Theory, Area Studies, Cultural Studies: Issues of Pedagogy in Multiculturalism 11
  • Notes 23
  • References 25
  • 3 - Doing Cultural Studies in Colleges of Education 27
  • Notes 39
  • References 40
  • 4 - Teaching Without Guarantees: Cultural Studies, Pedagogy, and Identity 42
  • Notes 69
  • References 71
  • 5 - 'It Ain't like Any Other Teaching': Some Versions of Teaching Cultural Studies 74
  • Notes 93
  • References 95
  • 6 - Mediating Desire: Visual Representation, Power, and Informed Consent in Teaching Feminist Cultural Studies 97
  • Notes 115
  • References 115
  • 7 - Teaching/Cultural Studies (or Pedagogy for 'World'-Travellers/ 'World'-Travelling Pedagogy) 117
  • Notes 128
  • References 128
  • 8 - Mirrors, Paintings, and Romances 131
  • Notes 151
  • References 154
  • 9 - Examining the Examination: Tracing the Effects of Pedagogic Authority on Cultural Studies Lecturers and Students 157
  • Notes 175
  • References 177
  • 10 - The Voice of Authority: on Lecturing in Cultural Studies 178
  • Notes 189
  • References 191
  • 11 - All Roads Lead to . . . Problems with Discipline 192
  • Notes 201
  • References 203
  • About the Book and Editors 205
  • About the Contributors 206
  • Index 208
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