A Question of Discipline: Pedagogy, Power, and the Teaching of Cultural Studies

By Joyce E. Canaan; Debbie Epstein | Go to book overview

7
Teaching/Cultural Studies
(or Pedagogy for
'World'-Travellers/
'World'-Travelling Pedagogy)

Lorraine Johnson-Riordan

In his lecture 'The Future of Cultural Studies' given to the Association for Cultural Studies at North East London Polytechnic (now the University of East London) in March 1986 (later published as Williams 1989), Raymond Williams argued that 'the heart' of Cultural Studies was its engagement with the relation between an intellectual project and its formation. This, he claimed, had to be applied to the project of Cultural Studies itself. 'We have to look at what kind of formation it was from which the project of Cultural Studies developed, and then at the changes of formation that produced different definitions of that project' ( Williams 1989: 152). Tracing the trajectory of Cultural Studies in his own and others' work back to the 1930s, Williams cited his teaching in adult education ('that notably unprivileged sector' [p. 154]) and later in the new universities and polytechnics, rather than any texts, as the site from which his Cultural Studies practice emerged. And it was the presence of 'new' students, women and working-class adults who had not previously had access to tertiary education and with whom Williams identified as working-class 'world'-travellers, that provided the occasion for the emergence of his Cultural Studies practice as a challenge both to existing bodies of disciplinary knowledge and traditional pedagogical practices.

Williams identified those times as a 'new educational conjuncture' brought about by changing historical, social, and cultural conditions. Central to the problematic of his Cultural Studies project was a crisis in the production and dissemination of knowledge which he saw as being constrained by a certain organization of disciplines, the push to vocational training (with its anti-intellectual overtones), and the technologiza

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A Question of Discipline: Pedagogy, Power, and the Teaching of Cultural Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • 1 - Questions of Discipline/ Disciplining Cultural Studies 1
  • Notes 9
  • References 10
  • 2 - Theory, Area Studies, Cultural Studies: Issues of Pedagogy in Multiculturalism 11
  • Notes 23
  • References 25
  • 3 - Doing Cultural Studies in Colleges of Education 27
  • Notes 39
  • References 40
  • 4 - Teaching Without Guarantees: Cultural Studies, Pedagogy, and Identity 42
  • Notes 69
  • References 71
  • 5 - 'It Ain't like Any Other Teaching': Some Versions of Teaching Cultural Studies 74
  • Notes 93
  • References 95
  • 6 - Mediating Desire: Visual Representation, Power, and Informed Consent in Teaching Feminist Cultural Studies 97
  • Notes 115
  • References 115
  • 7 - Teaching/Cultural Studies (or Pedagogy for 'World'-Travellers/ 'World'-Travelling Pedagogy) 117
  • Notes 128
  • References 128
  • 8 - Mirrors, Paintings, and Romances 131
  • Notes 151
  • References 154
  • 9 - Examining the Examination: Tracing the Effects of Pedagogic Authority on Cultural Studies Lecturers and Students 157
  • Notes 175
  • References 177
  • 10 - The Voice of Authority: on Lecturing in Cultural Studies 178
  • Notes 189
  • References 191
  • 11 - All Roads Lead to . . . Problems with Discipline 192
  • Notes 201
  • References 203
  • About the Book and Editors 205
  • About the Contributors 206
  • Index 208
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