A Question of Discipline: Pedagogy, Power, and the Teaching of Cultural Studies

By Joyce E. Canaan; Debbie Epstein | Go to book overview

may forge interdisciplinary work. 19 During the session two things became clear to me: that the journey of interdisciplinary students (as my own was) will most likely be in the reverse direction and that none of us really felt 'at home' in our putative homes. Most of us who are feminists forging interdisciplinary scholarship and pedagogy, I imagine, find it more the case that 'home' is a place of profound estrangement and considerable danger. A place where our work is systematically disproportionate and undervalued, where kinship is a battle we rarely win and our custodianship of teaching and learning can be as much a bitter as a joyous issue. Indeed, the metaphor of 'home', if we consider the conventional sexual politics of home, is unfortunately appropriate. Unlike Dorothy, home is not my haven or my destination when I click my heels and travel hopefully. Yet when I, as a teacher, hold out visions of Ithaca or Oz (those oases of pretended family), I share with students, indeed impose upon them, my problems with discipline, my difficulties with direction, and the dangers of strangeness at 'home'.

The stranger who comes home does not make [her]self at home but makes home strange20

I figure that if 'home' makes me a stranger, making 'home' strange is the least I can do.


Notes
1.
1. For several years, this has been my memory of the opening lines of Cavafy poem, ' Ithaca' ( 1976). It came as a shock to me to rediscover recently that what Cavafy actually wrote was: 'When you start on your journey to Ithaca, / then pray that the road is long, / full of adventure, full of knowledge. / Do not fear the Lestrygonians / and the Cyclops and the angry Poseidon, / You will never meet such as these on your path / if your thoughts remain lofty . . .'.
2.
Friedson ( 1970), in his analysis of medicine as a case study, posited defensive elitism as a defining characteristic of professions.
3.
The 'project of memory against forgetting' is set out as part of the 1955 Freedom Charter of the African National Congress.
4.
hooks ( 1991: 49). I am particularly moved by the discussion in the chapter, 'Choosing the Margin as a Space of Radical Openness', which raises the questions simultaneously of language and silence, openness and closure, home and exile-- the 'zoning', as I discuss in this chapter, of speech.
5.
It is probably not surprising that growing up as a nice jewish girl in the heyday of the Women's Liberation and Civil Rights moments in the United States, I developed an almost mystical faith in education as the road to liberation, the necessary condition for an anti-oppressive and democratic society, the roses with the bread.

-201-

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A Question of Discipline: Pedagogy, Power, and the Teaching of Cultural Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • 1 - Questions of Discipline/ Disciplining Cultural Studies 1
  • Notes 9
  • References 10
  • 2 - Theory, Area Studies, Cultural Studies: Issues of Pedagogy in Multiculturalism 11
  • Notes 23
  • References 25
  • 3 - Doing Cultural Studies in Colleges of Education 27
  • Notes 39
  • References 40
  • 4 - Teaching Without Guarantees: Cultural Studies, Pedagogy, and Identity 42
  • Notes 69
  • References 71
  • 5 - 'It Ain't like Any Other Teaching': Some Versions of Teaching Cultural Studies 74
  • Notes 93
  • References 95
  • 6 - Mediating Desire: Visual Representation, Power, and Informed Consent in Teaching Feminist Cultural Studies 97
  • Notes 115
  • References 115
  • 7 - Teaching/Cultural Studies (or Pedagogy for 'World'-Travellers/ 'World'-Travelling Pedagogy) 117
  • Notes 128
  • References 128
  • 8 - Mirrors, Paintings, and Romances 131
  • Notes 151
  • References 154
  • 9 - Examining the Examination: Tracing the Effects of Pedagogic Authority on Cultural Studies Lecturers and Students 157
  • Notes 175
  • References 177
  • 10 - The Voice of Authority: on Lecturing in Cultural Studies 178
  • Notes 189
  • References 191
  • 11 - All Roads Lead to . . . Problems with Discipline 192
  • Notes 201
  • References 203
  • About the Book and Editors 205
  • About the Contributors 206
  • Index 208
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