The Performance Challenge: Developing Management Systems to Make Employees Your Organization's Greatest Asset

By Jerry W. Gilley; Nathaniel W. Boughton et al. | Go to book overview

for developing action steps presents the most efficient means of addressing the performance challenge. Then and only then will employees be transformed into the organization's greatest asset.

Action steps can include: implementing the performance alignment process (Chapters 2-8), enhancing leadership effectiveness (Chapter 9), and creating virtual teams (Chapter 10). Each of these helps the organization improve its performance capacity and achieve desired business results. Regardless of the intervention selected, it must help stakeholders meet their needs and satisfy their expectations.


CONCLUSION

The first step in applying the performance alignment model is to conduct stakeholder valuation. By doing so, organizations identify the needs, expectations, and organizational realities of each stakeholder. This information will help improve employee quality and performance, expand market share, and achieve the strategic business goals and objectives of the organization. In addition, organizations will be able to avoid equilibrium, hemorrhaging, centeredness, and expansion practices that prevent them from growing or expanding their business in a positive, effective manner.

By understanding organizational stakeholder needs, expectations, and realities, organizations will be ready to link initiatives with their strategic business goals and objectives. Once this linkage has occurred, enlightened organizations develop job designs that enable employees to perform at the highest possible level--often meeting or exceeding performance standards (see Chapter 3). In this way, organizations link their stakeholders with the performance alignment process.

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The Performance Challenge: Developing Management Systems to Make Employees Your Organization's Greatest Asset
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Chapter 1 Why Organizations and Employees Fail to Achieve Desired Results 1
  • Conclusion 16
  • Chapter 2 Conducting Stakeholder Valuations 18
  • Conclusion 35
  • Chapter 3 Improving Job Design 36
  • Conclusion 49
  • Chapter 4 Establishing Synergistic Relationships 52
  • Conclusion 69
  • Chapter 5 Applying Performance Coaching 70
  • Conclusion 89
  • Chapter 6 Conducting Developmental Evaluations 90
  • Conclusion 113
  • Chapter 7 Creating Performance Growth and Development Plans 116
  • Conclusion 136
  • Chapter 8 Linking Compensation and Rewards to Performance Growth and Development 138
  • Conclusion 153
  • Chapter 9 Developin6 Leadership Effectiveness 154
  • Conclusion 170
  • Chapter 10 Creating Virtual Teams 171
  • Conclusion 189
  • Chapter 11 Beyond the Learning Organization 190
  • Conclusion 206
  • Appendix Performance Coaching Inventory 207
  • Manager's Self-Report 211
  • Competency Scorin6 Sheet 219
  • My Manager Report 220
  • Competency Scoring Sheet 229
  • References 233
  • Index 235
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