Modern Art and Society: An Anthology of Social and Multicultural Readings

By Maurice Berger | Go to book overview

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Modern Art and Society: An Anthology of Social and Multicultural Readings
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1: The New Cultural Politics of Difference 1
  • 2: Degas and the Dreyfus Affair a Portrait of the Artist as an Anti-Semite 25
  • Notes 44
  • 3: The Face and Voice of Blackness 51
  • 4: Going Native Paul Gauguin and the Invention of Primitivist Modernism 73
  • Notes 92
  • 5: Purism Straightening Up After the Great War 95
  • Notes 114
  • 6: Androgyny and Spectatorship 117
  • Notes 134
  • 7: Embodying Sexuality Marcel Duchamp in the Realm of Surrealism 139
  • Notes 155
  • 8: Demuth and Difference 158
  • Notes 171
  • 9: The Historian and the Icon Photography and the History of the American People in the 1930s and 1940s 173
  • Notes 198
  • 10: Rivera's Concept of History Ida RodrÍguez-Prampolini 201
  • Notes 215
  • 11: Recasting the Canon Norman Lewis and Jackson Pollock 216
  • Notes 228
  • 12: Objects of Liberation the Sculpture of Eva Hesse 231
  • Notes 245
  • 13: The Cultural Politics of Pop 252
  • Notes 270
  • 14: Aids Cultural Analysis/Cultural Activism 273
  • Notes 283
  • 15: Mapping 285
  • Notes 300
  • Index 303
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