The Love Trauma Syndrome: Free Yourself from the Pain of a Broken Heart

By Richard B. Rosse | Go to book overview

Chapter Twelve
Concluding Thoughts

Today was a busy work day. I saw patients from 8:00 a.m. this morning to after 6:00 p.m. There was little time between patients, as I was supervising and teaching three resident physicians who were doing a psychiatry training rotation with me. One was an internist, another was a family practitioner, and the third was a psychiatrist. Together we interviewed a variety of patients with different psychiatric conditions, such as depression and PTSD.

"When you come down to it, Dr. Rosse," the internal medicine resident asked me about psychiatric patients in general, "aren't these just weak people who need to be toughened up, who need a good talking to?" This was not an insensitive man, but someone who was struggling to understand psychiatric problems.

My response came to me quickly. "Aren't people with diabetes, or hypertension, or heart disease also 'weak' people with vulnerabilities in either their pancreases, blood vessels, or hearts?" I said. "People with psychiatric conditions have vulnerabilities in various brain regions--albeit the specific brain areas involved are not well defined at this point in time." He thought a moment, but he was still not satisfied. "But at least in medical conditions you can see what's wrong with them. In diabetes, you can take their blood and measure their elevated blood sugar. In hypertension, you can measure their blood pressure and see their blood pressure elevations. And with heart disease, you can take an electrocardiogram and see their damaged hearts, or perform angiography and see their clogged arteries. In psychiatric conditions, like depression or PTSD, all's you have to

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