History of the Jews - Vol. 5

By Heinrich Graetz | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V.
LIGHT AND SHADE.

Jews under Mahometan Rulers--Expulsion from Vienna--Jews admitted by Elector Frederick William into the Mark of Brandenburg--Charge of Child-murder in Metz--Milder Treatment of Jews throughout Europe--Christian Champions of the Jews: Jurieu, Oliger Pauli, and Moses Germanus--Predilection of Christians for the Study of Jewish Literature--Richard Simon --Interest taken by Charles XI in the Karaites--Peringer and Jacob Trigland -- German Attacks on Judaism by Wülfer, Wagenseil, and Eisenmenger--Circumstances of the Publication of Judaism Unmasked--The Alenu Prayer--Surenhuysius, Basnage, Unger, Wolf, and Toland.

1669-1700 C. E.

THE princes and nations of Europe and Asia showed great consideration in not disturbing the Messianic farce of the Jews, who were quietly allowed to make themselves ridiculous. A pause had come in the constantly recurring persecution of the Jews, which did not, however, last very long. The regular succession of accusations, vexations, and banishments soon re-commenced. The contrast between the followers of Mahomet and those of Jesus is very striking. In Turkey the Jews were free from persecution, in spite of their great excitement, and absurd dreams of a national Messiah. In Africa, Sid Gailand and later Muley Arshid, sultan of Tafilet, Fez, and Morocco, oppressed the Jews, partly on account of their activity, partly from rapacity. But this ceased with the next sovereign, Muley Ismail. He was a patron of the Jews, and entrusted several with important posts. He had two Jewish advisers, Daniel Toledano of Miquenes, a friend of Jacob Sasportas, a Talmudist and experienced in state affairs, and Joseph Maimaran likewise from Miquenes.

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