History of the Jews - Vol. 5

By Heinrich Graetz | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVIII.
EVENTS PRECEDING THE REVOLUTIONS OF FEBRUARY AND
MARCH, 1848, AND THE SUBSEQUENT SOCIAL
ADVANCE OF THE JEWS.

Return of Montefiore and Crémieux from the East--Patriotic Suggestions--General Indecision--Gabriel Riesser--Michael Creizenach--Reform Party in Frankfort--Rabbinical Assembly--Holdheim--Reform Association--Zachariah Frankel--The Berlin Reform Temple--Michael Sachs--His Character--His Biblical Exegesis--Holdheim and Sachs--The Jewish German Church-- Progress of Jewish Literature--Ewald and his Works--Enfranchisement of English Jews--The Breslau Jewish College--Its Founders--The Mortara Case--Pope Pius IX--The Alliance Israélite--Astruc, Cohn, Caballo, Masuel, Netter--The American Jews--The "Union of American Hebrew Congregations"--The Anglo-Jewish Association--Benisch, Löwy--The "Israelitische Allianz"--Wertheimer, Goldschmidt, Kuranda--Rapid Social Advance of the Jews--Rise of Anti-Semitism.

1840--1870 C. E.

THE return from the East of the Jewish envoys, who not only had saved a few men from death, but had rescued all Judaism from disgrace, was a veritable triumphal procession. From Corfu to Paris and London, and even to the depths of Poland, the Jewish communities were unanimous in expressions of thanksgiving to the rescuers, and sought by visible signs to evince their gratitude, and at the same time show their patriotic sentiments for Judaism. The tributes took the form of public orations, addresses, articles written in every European language, naturally also in Hebrew, and both in prose and verse. Attentions and gifts were freely bestowed upon the two chief representatives of Judaism, to celebrate in a worthy fashion the momentous events which had occurred in Damascus, and transmit the remembrance of these deeds to posterity. Crémieux, who was the first to set out on the return journey,

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