Brandeis: A Free Man's Life

By Alpheus Thomas Mason | Go to book overview

cess on both sides." Nevertheless Nagel gamely conceded: "If Boston is a success nothing in St. Louis can compare with it.

"Yes," his letter concluded, "you seem one of those unfortunate individuals who are doomed for life to say which one of many good things they want. We rejoice with you, Louis; you cannot blame us for feeling the one regret, that you are to a great extent lost to the family, and to Fannie and me and the boy particularly."


CHAPTER FOUR
Boston: Hub of the Universe

CERTAIN that he had made the right decision, Brandeis set out for Boston early in the summer of 1879. Along in July, after less than a year in St. Louis, he formed the partnership with Warren, whose family's paper-mill business and other interests promised substantial practice at the outset.

The start was delayed a little, however, because Louis could not hang out his shingle until he was admitted to the Massachusetts Bar. Also some decision had to be reached as to the firm's name. Should it be "Warren & Brandeis," or "Brandeis & Warren"? The usual test was priority of admission to the Bar. Brandeis had been admitted to practice in Missouri before Warren, but Warren was already a member of the Massachusetts Bar. "I don't give a rap," Warren told his partner in a hastily written note just prior to going off for a week-end, "but I think it worth-while to observe proper etiquette." No examinations for the Bar were scheduled till fall, but Brandeis naturally wished to expedite the matter. "The Committee here," he wrote Nagel, "ordinarily admits attorneys from other states only upon proof of a few years' practice there; but I think I shall be able to slide in anyhow as the Chief Justice [of Massachusetts] intends to submit my case." Leaving the whole matter to Brandeis, Warren suggested: "If you are admitted on the Comity of States, your name, I think, should come first." But it didn't. The firm established itself as "Warren & Brandeis."

-56-

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