Brandeis: A Free Man's Life

By Alpheus Thomas Mason | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE
All Sides and Angles of the Railroad Rate Situation, 1913-1914

THE RAILROADS made their new bid for increased rates on May 14, 1913, when fifty-two lines in so-called "official classification territory" petitioned the I.C.C. for a rehearing of the 1910 case. Alleging increased capital charges, wages, taxes, and other burdens, they asked for a 5 per cent horizontal rate advance.

Two days before this official petition Brandeis had written Alfred: I don't know whether I shall actively take part in Rate Advance matters, but I have inspired some editorials the country over demanding efficiency and abolishing interlocking directorates first." By mid-July Brandeis was back in the case. His first act was to draw up for Commissioner J. Russell Marble a list of questions on freight cars, steel rails, interlocking directorates, and "so-called legal and public expenses" of the railroads. "If full answers are given to these inquiries," he wrote Marble, July 18, "some light will be thrown upon efficiency in operation, and the comparative data collected should at least serve to show the insufficiency of present accounting, and the necessity of scientific cost keeping, and the ultimate establishment of a Federal Bureau of Railroad Costs."


AN EQUIVOCAL ASSIGNMENT

Brandeis wasn't sure that he was going to do more than this on the current case, but on August 15 Commissioner James S. Harlan invited him to aid the Commission. Harlan wrote at great length about the capacity in

____________________
Though the proposed increase in tariffs averaged about 5 per cent higher than the existing rates, the increase in some instances was below 3 per cent, and in others rose as high as 50 per cent. The increases were not general as to commodities or as to territories, there being many exceptions. ( I.C.C. Reports, Vol. XXXI, June 1914 to October 1914, pp. 355-56.)
Following the line taken in the 1910 case, Brandeis suggested that the Commission might wish to employ F. Lincoln Hutchins, who had done some work for Harrington Emerson, and called attention to Hutchins's articles in The Engineering Magazine: "The Railroad Problem: Rates, Unit Costs and Efficiency", January 1912; "The Railroad Problem: Capitalization and Regulation; The Deduction from Unit Costs of 20 American Railways, February 1912.
In the railroad world this expression is used to describe the territory bounded by Canada and the Great Lakes on the north, by the Atlantic Ocean on the east, by the Mississippi on the west, and by the Ohio and Potomac rivers on the south. This classification territory is divided into three rate areas, known as New England, Trunk Line, and Central Freight Association territory. ( I.C.C. Reports, Vol. XXXI, June 1914 to October 1914, p. 353. For map, showing the subdivisions, see p. 350.)

-335-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Brandeis: A Free Man's Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 713

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.