Brandeis: A Free Man's Life

By Alpheus Thomas Mason | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THIRTY-SEVEN
Extrajudicial Activities

IN THE early nineteen twenties Brandeis bought a small place on Cape Cod not far from the village of Chatham. The house, a small clapboard structure, stood on a lonely hill, amid a wide expanse of sand dune, cottonwood trees, and scrubby green hillocks. Inside, the rooms were as plain as in his Washington apartment. His bedroom-study downstairs was austere, with an oak table, some hard chairs, a small electric heater, a case of books, and a bed covered with a nondescript blanket. A few simple pictures hung on the walls. During an interview in the summer of 1940, the visitor learned that one was of a Danish folk-school. "There," the Justice said, "were really planted the seeds of democracy." Another, yellowed with age, showed some small children. "Yes, that was my mother's. She gave it to me before she died. The one on the left is of me." There was a picture of Sam Warren at the helm of an old sloop, a newspaper likeness of Norman Hapgood, both hung by thumb-tacks. Turning slowly to a small picture on his desk, a catch came in his voice. "You know that man, Justice Benjamin Cardozo. He was my very dear friend, a beautiful character. His work raised the standard of the New York Circuit Court of Appeals, and even of our Court. We were very close."1

Brandeis's life at Chatham was typical of the man's deep love of simplicity and reflected "the universal element in greatness -- the capacity to stand alone, to be independent of the activities and judgments of the restf of mankind."2

Amid these bare, familiar surroundings, remote from urban civilization, he pursued his extracurricular activities most assiduously. Men from all walks of life sought his advice and found it generously given. He would sit quietly, listen intently, then with a question or a simple comment he would go to the heart of the matter, and the difficulty would evaporate. As Woodrow Wilson once said: "A talk with Brandeis always sweeps the cobwebs out of one's mind."

Many noted Brandeis's resemblance to Lincoln -- the wiry strength, the tall, angular, slightly stooped frame, sharp features, deeply set eyes of blue gray, vastly sympathetic, with a trace of sadness, and remarkably bright. He allowed his gray hair to grow rather long and brushed it carelessly, like a philosopher or prophet of old. Slender, sensitive hands suggested the artist; his skin, of olive hue, gave an appearance of robust health that some-

____________________
Cardozo had died July 9, 1938.

-582-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Brandeis: A Free Man's Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 713

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.