The Civil Wars: A Military History of England, Scotland, and Ireland 1638-1660

By John Kenyon; Jane Ohlmeyer et al. | Go to book overview

LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS

BERNARD CAPP is Professor of History at the University of Warwick, where he has taught since 1968. His publications include Cromwell's Navy: The Fleet and the English Revolution, 1648-1660 ( Oxford, 1992); The World of John Taylor the Water-Poet, 1578-1653 ( Oxford, 1994); The Fifth Monarchy Men ( London, 1972); and Astrology and the Popular Press ( Ithaca, NY, 1979). He is currently writing a book on female autonomy and networks in early modern England ( When Gossips Meet) and a reassessment of the English revolution.

CHARLES CARLTON is Professor of History at North Carolina State University. His books include Charles I, the Personal Monarch ( London, 1983); Royal Childhood ( London, 1986); Archbishop William Laud ( London, 1987); Royal Mistresses ( London, 1990), and Going to the Wars: The Experience of the British Civil Wars 1638-1651 ( London, 1994). He is currently working on a book on the concept of monarchy in the seventeenth century.

PETER EDWARDS is Reader in History at the Roehampton Institute, London. He is the author of The Horse Trade of Tudor and Stuart England ( Cambridge, 1988) and of articles on the supply of horses and arms during the English Civil Wars. He is currently writing a book on the arms trade and the British Civil Wars, 1638-51.

EDWARD M. FURGOL, a graduate of the College of Wooster and the University of Oxford (Pembroke and St Cross Colleges), has a strong interest in early modern military history. The Regimental History of the Covenanting Armies, 1639-1651 ( Edinburgh, 1990) is his major work on the subject. After working for the Pendle Heritage Centre and Historic Scotland, he became the curator of The Navy Museum, Washington, DC, in 1990. His professional duties include co-ordinating the internship and offsite exhibits program of the US Navy's Naval Historical Center. In addition to his new expertise in American naval history, he has continued to write and speak on British history.

IAN GENTLES is the author of The New ModelArmy in England, Ireland and Scotland, 1645-1653 ( Oxford, 1992), and numerous articles on the English Civil Wars. He is presently at work on a three-kingdoms history of the civil wars. He is Professor of History at Glendon College, York University ( Toronto).

RONALD HUTTON is Professor of British History at the University of Bristol. He has written seven books, of which the first was The Royalist War Effort, 1642-1646 ( London, 1982) and subsequent examples include Charles II: King of England, Scotland, and Ireland ( Oxford, 1989); The Pagan Religions of the Ancient British Isles ( Oxford, 1991); and The Rise and Fail of Merry England ( Oxford, 1994).

-xvii-

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The Civil Wars: A Military History of England, Scotland, and Ireland 1638-1660
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Maps xi
  • J. P. Kenyon 1927-1996 - A Personal Appreciation xiii
  • List of Contributors xvii
  • Introduction xix
  • Part One - Civil Wars in the Stuart Kingdoms 1
  • 1 - The Background to the Civil Wars in the Stuart Kingdoms 3
  • 2 - The Civil Wars in Scotland 41
  • 3 - The Civil Wars in Ireland 73
  • 4 - The Civil Wars in England 103
  • 5 - Naval Operations 156
  • Part Two - The British and Irish Experiences of War 193
  • 6 - Sieges and Fortifications 195
  • 7 - Logistics and Supply 234
  • 8 - Civilians 272
  • Postlude - Between War and Peace 1651-1662 306
  • Notes 329
  • Select Bibliography 345
  • Chronology 353
  • Index 383
  • Acknowledgement 391
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