The Civil Wars: A Military History of England, Scotland, and Ireland 1638-1660

By John Kenyon; Jane Ohlmeyer et al. | Go to book overview

4
THE CIVIL WARS IN ENGLAND

IAN GENTLES


Recruitment 1

In a country where most of the population deplored civil war, and wished to fight for neither side, how did king and Parliament recruit the armies they needed to wage their struggle -- not only recruit about 140,000 men between them, but arm, supply, and pay them as well? At first each side resorted to quasi-legal instruments: the Commission of Array for the king, and the Militia Ordinance for Parliament. Despatched to each county and city, the Commission of Array was a medieval Latin document inscribed on a parchment roll, and impressed with the Great Seal. It empowered the leading men to take charge of their county or city and arm it for the king. The Militia Ordinance was a statute lacking one vital element: the signature and seal of the king. It created committees in each county and major city, charged with raising forces for Parliament.

At first neither instrument was notably successful. When the king declared war against Parliament and raised his standard at Nottingham in August 1642 fewer than a thousand cavalry turned up. What really brought soldiers to the king were commissions to individual men to mobilize regular troops for service under him. While there must have been an element of coercion in all military recruitment, initially the royalist armies did not resort to conscription or 'impressment'. Parliament, which controlled the levers of central power, employed conscription almost from the beginning, while the king did not impress men on a large scale until the spring of 1644. 2 When constables went out to press men their preferred targets were bachelors, idle men, alehouse haunters, vagabonds, and criminals. While parish officers were keen to shovel the dregs of society into the army, county committees insisted that recruits be able-bodied. Boys, the sick, and the aged were not acceptable. It was servants, apprentices, and labourers -- landless men still too young to be householders -- who were most frequently impressed.

Important as they were, the county trained bands were but one source of manpower for the king. A number of volunteer regiments were mobilized by leading

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Civil Wars: A Military History of England, Scotland, and Ireland 1638-1660
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Maps xi
  • J. P. Kenyon 1927-1996 - A Personal Appreciation xiii
  • List of Contributors xvii
  • Introduction xix
  • Part One - Civil Wars in the Stuart Kingdoms 1
  • 1 - The Background to the Civil Wars in the Stuart Kingdoms 3
  • 2 - The Civil Wars in Scotland 41
  • 3 - The Civil Wars in Ireland 73
  • 4 - The Civil Wars in England 103
  • 5 - Naval Operations 156
  • Part Two - The British and Irish Experiences of War 193
  • 6 - Sieges and Fortifications 195
  • 7 - Logistics and Supply 234
  • 8 - Civilians 272
  • Postlude - Between War and Peace 1651-1662 306
  • Notes 329
  • Select Bibliography 345
  • Chronology 353
  • Index 383
  • Acknowledgement 391
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 391

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.