English Literary Periodicals

By Walter Graham | Go to book overview

VI
LATER MAGAZINES OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY

For several years previous to 1731, Edward Cave talked of his plan to booksellers and printers, but none of them thought it worth a trial. Yet the Gentleman's Magazine had plenty of rivals as soon as it began to prosper. Like the Tatler, it initiated a movement, and determined to a great degree the course of periodical evolution. As was true in the case of the essay periodical of Addison and Steele, not every follower of Cave Magazine can be taken into account in this survey. But in a similar way, it is valuable to notice the variations of the type, and the diverse uses these variants served in the literary history of the century which followed.

Johnson, who wrote the preface of the Gentleman's for the year 1738, enumerated twenty imitators which the success of this miscellany had given rise to. He reserved the least complimentary of his observations for the London Magazine, which had begun to give its model the keenest kind of competition, and continued to do so until it finally ceased publication in 1785. Page for page, the London Magazine of 1732 was an almost exact imitation of the Gentleman's. Whereas Cave's subtitle was "Monthly Intelligencer," the London's was "Gentleman's Monthly Intelligencer." Its motto, after his own, was "Multum in Parvo." Even a similar "Society" was suggested on the title page. In make-up, the London perfectly matched its prototype. The "View of Weekly Essays and Disputes this Month," quoting long extracts from the Universal Spectator, Craftsman, etc., ran to thirty-six pages in No. 1, longer than the same department in the

-161-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
English Literary Periodicals
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 430

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.