Edgar Allan Poe: A Critical Biography

By Arthur Hobson Quinn | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XV
The Broadway Journal and the Poems of 1845

Poe left the staff of the Mirror because he saw in a new journal a better opportunity. While still on the Mirror's staff he had become a welcome contributor to the Broadway Journal. This weekly had been founded in January, 1845, by Charles F. Briggs, as editor, and John Bisco as publisher. Briggs, a Massachusetts man, who had written a novel, The Adventures of Harry Franco, and was beginning to use the hero's name as a nom de guerre, met Poe through Lowell's written introduction. John Bisco was also a New England man, who had been at one time editor of the Knickerbocker. They were partners, sharing the profits, if there were any.1

Poe contributed to the first and second numbers of the Broadway Journal his critique of Elizabeth Barrett Drama of Exile and Other Poems,2 the American reprint of her Poems of 1844. His treatment of those poems which he believed to be mystical, was at times unsympathetic. But his glowing tribute to her "wild and magnificent genius" which rendered her book "a flame" and which he believed justified him in calling her "the greatest--the most glorious of her sex," pleased her, if she was somewhat embarrassed by it. R. H. Home, with whom Poe kept up a correspondence, sent him on May 17, 1845, a note from Miss Barrett to Home, in which she said in part: "But I am uncomfortable about my message to Mr. Poe, lest it should not be grateful enough in the sound of it. Will you tell him--what is quite the truth-- that in my own opinion he has dealt with me most generously, and that I thank him for his candour as for a part of his kindness. Will you tell him also that he has given my father pleasure; which is giving it to me more than twice. Also, the review is very ably written, and the reviewer has so obviously and thoroughly read my poems, as to be a wonder among critics.--Will you tell Mr. Poe this, or to this effect, dear Mr. Home--all but part of the last sentence which perad-

____________________
1
Ms. contract between Bisco and Briggs, December 23, 1844, is in Collection of W. H. Koester.
2
Broadway Journal, I (January 4, and 11), pp. 4-8, 17-20.

-451-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Edgar Allan Poe: A Critical Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 808

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.