Edgar Allan Poe: A Critical Biography

By Arthur Hobson Quinn | Go to book overview

Appendices

I. THE THEATRICAL CAREER OF EDGAR POE'S PARENTS

IN a list of this extent, space will not permit argument concerning the conflicting testimony of different sources. In general the magazine or newspaper criticism published after the event is preferable to the advertisement. Owing to the constant changes of production on short notice, playbills are not as good evidence as newspaper notices of the succeeding day or even of the day of production. Where advertisements are the only available sources and differ from each other as to the parts assumed by the Poes, I have had to base my decision on their previous or later assumption of the parts, on the relative reliability of the newspapers, or on other factors. Where it is certain that the Poes took part in the play but no cast is given, their probable rôles are printed in brackets. Parts taken by Charles Hopkins are given only in connection with the Poes.

In preparing this list, its primary object, to show the variety and importance of the parts sustained by David and Elizabeth Arnold Hopkins Poe, has never been sacrificed to mere uniformity. When the part assumed by either of them is first played, the name of the play and its author are given, if possible. When the rôle is repeated, the author or play is given only when the part is difficult to identify or when, as in Poe's last season, it seemed important to have the full record immediately available. Repetitions of the play during a season are briefly indicated, either on its first production or on its repetition, but the completeness of the chronicle has never been impaired merely to save space.


PARTS ACTED BY ELIZABETH ARNOLD

1796-1797

SOURCES: James Moreland. "The Theatre in Portland in the Eighteenth Century," New England Quarterly, XI ( June, 1938), 331-342; Search of Eastern Herald and Gazette of Maine by Miss Viola C. Hamilton, Secretary American Antiquarian Society; George O. Seilhamer, History of the American Theatre, Vol. III.

-697-

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