What Is Non-Fiction Cinema? On the Very Idea of Motion Picture Communication

By Trevor Ponech | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
John Grierson, Documentary (1) Cinema Quarterly (Winter 1932): 68.
2.
Louis Giannetti, Understanding Movies, 7th ed. ( Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1996), 33.
3.
Richard Meran Barsam, "American Direct Cinema: The Representation of Reality", Persistence of Vision 3/4 ( 1986): 131.
4.
Jean-Louis Comolli, quoted in Realism and Cinema, ed. Christopher Williams ( London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1980), 226.
5.
Bill Nichols, Representing Reality: Issues and Concepts in Documentary ( Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1991), 115.
6.
This example is one used by Charles Sanders Peirce in discussing what he calls indexical signs. See Charles Hartshorne, Paul Weiss, and A. W. Burks, eds., Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce, 8 vols. ( Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 1931-1958), 2:285.
7.
My observations on natural indication derive from Fred Dretske analysis in Explaining Behavior: Reasons in a World of Causes ( Cambridge, Mass.: M.I.T. Press, 1988), 54-59.
8.
A comprehensive discursive as well as photographic survey of Bateson andp Mead's research is to be found in their Balinese Character: A Photographic Analysis ( New York: New York Academy of Sciences, 1942). For a critical reevaluation of their work on Balinese culture, see Gorden D. Jensen and Luh Ketut Suryani, The Balinese People: A Reinvestigation of Character ( Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992).
9.
Bateson and Mead, Balinese Character, 167.
10.
Kent Bach and Robert Harnish, Linguistic Communication and Speech Acts ( Cambridge, Mass.: M.I.T. Press, 1979), 39-46.
11.
Carl Plantinga, "Defining Documentary: Fiction, Non-Fiction, and Projected Worlds", Persistence of Vision 5 ( 1987): 44-53; "The Mirror Framed: A Case for Expression in Documentary", Wide Angle 13 ( 1991): 41-53; "Moving Pictures and Nonfiction: Two Approaches", in Post-Theory: Reconstructing Film Studies, ed. David Bordwell and Noel Carroll ( Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1996), 307-324; Rhetoric and Representation in Nonfiction Film ( New York: Cambridge University Press, 1997).
12.
Bach and Harnish, Linguistic Communication, 47.
13.
Carl Plantinga, "Blurry Boundaries, Troubling Typologies, and the Unruly Nonfiction Film", review of Representing Reality, by Bill Nichols, Semiotica 98 ( 1994): 395.
14.
A concise analysis of the confirmative is as follows. Where e is a sentence in some language, S is the speaker of that sentence, and H is the listener: In uttering e, S confirms (the claim) that P if S expresses:
i. the belief that P, based on some truth-seeking procedure, and
ii. the intention that H believes that P because S has support for P.

See Bach and Harnish, Linguistic Communication, 43.

-36-

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What Is Non-Fiction Cinema? On the Very Idea of Motion Picture Communication
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 7
  • 1 - What is Non-Fiction Cinema? 8
  • Notes 36
  • 2 - Representation and Depiction 40
  • Notes 69
  • 3 - What About Reality? 73
  • Notes 95
  • 4 - Plans for Non-Fiction 98
  • Notes 114
  • 5 - Planning for Content 116
  • Notes 140
  • 6 - Planning for Force 143
  • Notes 171
  • 7 - Perceptual Access to Cinematic Meaning 175
  • Notes 206
  • 8 - Aspects of Interpretation 213
  • Notes 242
  • 9 - The Truth of Non-Fiction 246
  • Notes 276
  • Works Cited 281
  • Index 293
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