Art in Latin American Architecture

By Paul F. Damaz | Go to book overview

Art in Modern Architecture

"Architecture is still very much an art in Latin America. The articulate elements in the community expect more from architects than purely 'functional' solutions." This was true in 1955 when Henry Russell Hitchcock wrote his perspicacious book "Latin American Architecture Since 1945," and, in general, it is still the case today, although in the last few years the bare American skyscraper has made deep inroads in some Latin American countries.

In adopting the basic concepts of functionalism, Latin American architects have not followed the extreme, austere, wing of modern architecture. The most important building in South America, which houses the Ministry of Education and Health in Rio, is far from being the simple parallelepipedon dear to the followers of Mies. A landmark of modern Latin American architecture, it is an articulate building where contrasting volumes assembled in perfect composition are enhanced by paintings, sculptures and gardens in perfect plastic unity. In Latin America, more than in any other part of the world, architecture is regarded as an art: "I have always considered architecture as a work of art, and only as such is it capable of subsisting," declared Oscar Niemeyer.

The separation of art and architecture has never been envisaged either in the minds of the public or in the intentions of the architects. Latin Americans have kept the long art traditions of their Mediterranean and Indian forefathers. They show a definite taste for strong colors and rich decoration. They are romantic, sensitive, extrovert, exuberant and responsive to the emotional impact of the grandiose. Their imagination and rich fantasy find no difficulty in accepting the strangest forms that may be suggested by their architects and painters.

Architects and artists do not form two separate classes, as in the United States. Intellectual "milieux" are rather small: architects, artists, writers and other intellectuals know one another, maintain constant social contacts and often are close friends. There is no barrier between these professions. While architects in the United States, with or without their consent, rapidly become specialists, Latin American architects receive the most varied commissions, from the simplest commercial or industrial building to the most imaginative free-form pavilion.

Architects and artists are trained in the same schools, and several architects have become well- known painters and sculptors: the Mexican muralist Juan O'Gorman was one of the pioneers of modern Mexican architecture, and the architect Firminio Saldanha has become one of the best Brazilian mural painters. The Colombian artists Alejandro Obregón and Eduardo Ramirez, and the Chilean painter Roberto Matta, were trained as architects.

Architects are very much aware of activities in the art world. Many have art collections that reveal the refined taste of their owners and enable one to see, side by side, precious pieces of pre-Columbian art, gracious colonial baroque figures and ultra-modern abstract paintings. Some architects are directors or members of local museums, art galleries and art schools.

-68-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Art in Latin American Architecture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Picture Credits 6
  • Acknowledgments 7
  • Color Illustrations 8
  • Contents 9
  • Author's Note 11
  • Preface 13
  • Foreword 14
  • Part 1 19
  • Sources of Latin American Culture 23
  • The Pre-Columbian Heritage 27
  • Colonial Art and Architecture 35
  • Modern Architecture 42
  • Contemporary Art in Latin America 52
  • Art in Modern Architecture 68
  • Part 2 107
  • Schools 129
  • Theaters, Restaurants, Clubs and Commercial Buildings 155
  • Hospitals and Religious Buildings 168
  • Hotels, Apartment Buildings and Private Houses 183
  • Monuments and Memorials 197
  • Landscape Architecture 208
  • Experimental Architecture 222
  • Bibliography 230
  • Index 231
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 234

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.