Taxation in American States and Cities

By Richard T. Ely | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV.
EXPERIENCE OF OHIO

PROBABLY the most vigorous effort To apply present methods may be found in Ohio, and to the experience of Ohio I will accordingly devote some considerable space.1.

The Ohio system is the Maryland idea perfected, though perfected seems the wrong word to use; for, as already remarked, it is characteristic of this system that the more you perfect it, the worse you make it. However, it is a vigorous attempt to carry the Maryland idea into practice.


CONSTITUTIONAL PROVISIONS.

It may be remarked in general of the Ohio constitution, that it imposes excessive limitations upon the legislative power. It prescribes too many things, for it was drawn up at a time when becoming alarmed at abuses of power, people were more inclined to abolish or restrict power than to learn how to use it properly; as sensible a proceeding as that of the mother who wished her boy to learn to swim, without

____________________
1
It may be proper to state first that on my arrival in Columbus I was taken to the office of the Governor, Hon. Joseph B. Foraker, by my friend, Rev. Washington Gladden; that I was courteously received by the Governor, and by him introduced to other gentlemen whom it seemed desirable that I should meet. and every facility given me for the prosecution of my inquiries. Special mention should be made of the courtesy of Hon. Emil Kiesewetter, Auditor of State, who explained at length every point in the system of taxation which is under his control

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