Taxation in American States and Cities

By Richard T. Ely | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI.
TAXATION OF THE MANUFACTURE AND SALE OF INTOXICATING LIQUORS.

MODIFIED PROHIBITION.

THE sentiment in favor of restricting the liquor traffic is in our Southern states daily increasing in strength, and some of our best-known and most respected public men have pronounced in favor of total prohibition. This sentiment has been the natural outgrowth of the actual condition of affairs, for the liquor saloon is seen to be the bane of politics as well as a curse to our industrial and domestic life. While public sentiment will not warrant prohibition in all parts of a state like Maryland, it is evidently time to proceed to place restraints upon the liquor traffic.

I recommend, in my report to the Maryland legislature, that the number of places where liquor may be sold be limited to one to every two thousand of the population in incorporated cities, and to one to every fifteen hundred of the population in those parts of counties outside of incorporated cities; that the municipalities and counties be divided into liquor districts accordingly, and that once a year the right to sell liquor in each be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, under heavy penalties for violation of Sunday law and laws relating to sale of liquor to minors, and to other matters which, for the public good, may be included within laws. The prohibitionists in their organ admit that a largely diminished number of saloons diminishes the liquor traffic,

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