American Painting of the Nineteenth Century: Realism, Idealism, and the American Experience

By Barbara Novak | Go to book overview

Bibliography

The Bibliography has been revised and updated for this edition.


PRIMARY SOURCES

The establishment of the Inventory of American Paintings Executed before 1914, National Collection of Fine Arts, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. has made it possible to have a fuller recording of little-known works by individual artists, substantially assisting our knowledge of the scope and content of these works.

Other than the art itself, for the student of nineteenth-century American art, nothing is more valuable than the primary source material located in manuscripts--journals, letters, and so on--and in contemporary periodicals. These are the sources from which American art history can and should be rewritten and re-evaluated.


MANUSCRIPT MATERIAL

Much manuscript material has been scrupulously gathered and microfilmed by the Archives of American Art in Detroit. Microfilms are also available for study at the New York office of the Archives. For this book, I have consulted especially:

American Art-Union papers. The New-York Historical Society.

Thomas Cole papers, photostatic copies in The New-York Historical Society. Originals in the collection of The New York State Library, Albany.

Asher Brown Durand papers. The New York Public Library.

Martin J. Heade papers. Archives of American Art. Heade-Church correspondence.

William Sidney Mount papers. Suffolk Museum and Carriage House, Stony Brook, Long Island. Microfilm in The New York Public Library.

A good guide to manuscript collections in America is:

HAMER, PHILIP M. (ed.). A Guide to Archives and Manuscripts in the United States. Compiled for the National Historical Publications Commission. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1961.


CONTEMPORARY PERIODICALS

An excellent guide to nineteenth-century periodicals is:

POOLE, WILLIAM FREDERICK. An Index to Periodical Literature. New York and London: 1853. 3d ed., Boston: 1882. First Supplement, Boston: 1888. Second Supplement, Boston: 1895. Third Supplement, Boston: 1897. Fourth Supplement, Boston: 1903. Among the periodicals in which I found material especially useful for the study of American painting were: The Crayon; The Dial; New York Mirror; North American Review; The Knickerbocker Magazine; Southern Literary Messenger; Cosmopolitan Art Journal; The Literary World; The New York American.

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