Bright Air, Brilliant Fire: On the Matter of the Mind

By Gerald M. Edelman | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Responsibility for the views expressed here is completely mine, and so is that for any residual faults this book may possess. Had it not been for the responses and criticisms of many people, the burden of fault would have been much larger. I express my gratitude to all who have been generous, knowing that I cannot list everyone who has been helpful.

Susan Hassler, Editor of The Neurosciences Institute, lent her expertise at all stages and her help was invaluable. Kathryn Crossin, who also contributed to the editing of my trilogy, made a number of important editorial comments on the present book. So did George N. Reeke, Jr., my close collaborator, who has made major contributions to the design of recognition automata. Olaf Sporns, my former student and now my colleague, made many imaginative suggestions and unstintingly lent his artistic talents to the design of many of the figures. His contributions were essential.

I am particularly grateful to Susan Borden and Henry G. Walter, Jr., who independently made felicitous suggestions about the organization of the book. W. Einar Gall, the Scientific Director of the Institute, and Institute Fellows Giulio Tononi and Joseph Gally made important critical remarks. Detlev Ploog did the same during his stay as a Visiting Fellow.

This is the only one of my books that my wife, Maxine, read in its incipient stages. Her positive responses helped me shape some of the views expressed in the final parts. I thank her for them as well as for her encouragement in this and other matters of the mind.

Finally, implicit in my title is an acknowledgment to the Greek discovery

-xv-

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