Halfway House: A Comedy of Degrees

By Maurice Hewlett | Go to book overview

VII
SHE GLOSSES THE TEXT

HAD Duplessis, flowers in hand, sued his forgiveness at any time, she was not the woman to be stern. That was not in her; she was at once too sensitive to the flattery of the prayer, and too generous to refuse it. But at this particular time she felt very strong; fresh from communion with her friend, secure in him, she felt equal to judging a dozen Tristrams -- and to judging them leniently. "They know not what they do." That was why she had smiled so wisely to herself on her way upstairs; and it may have been why she wore some of his flowers in the waistband of her gown that night. It was one of her most charming gowns, too; mouse-coloured tulle. In the belt of this she set crimson roses, of Tristram's offering.

She dined out, and went on to a party. Duplessis was waiting for her at the foot of the stairs; they went up together. He had never yet taken possession of her in that manner, and cannot be excused of brutality. But he was quick to presume; was not at all a good object for generosity. Her eyes had answered his inquiry -- "Forgiven?" before he touched

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Halfway House: A Comedy of Degrees
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Book I 1
  • I - Mr. Germin Takes Notice 3
  • II - Mr. Germain Revels Sedately 17
  • III - Ditplessis Prevaricates 23
  • IV - A Miss and a Catch 34
  • V - How to Break a Hedge 45
  • VI - Miss Middleham is Invited to Confirm a Vision 55
  • VII - Miss Middleham Has Visions of Her Own 65
  • VIII - Friendship's Garland 74
  • IX - The Welding of the Bolt 91
  • X - Cranylus with Marina: the Incredible Word 103
  • XI - Cool Comfort 113
  • XII - Alarums 123
  • XIII - What They Said at Home 140
  • XIV - The News Reaches the Pyrenees 153
  • XV - A Philosopher Embales 171
  • XVI - Wedding Day 181
  • XVII - The Wedding Night 192
  • Book II 205
  • I - In Which We Pay a First Visit to Southover 207
  • II - Reflections on Honeymoons and Suchlike 221
  • III - Matters of Election 235
  • IV - "London Nights and Days 253
  • V - Lord Gunner Ascertains Where We Are 262
  • VI - Senhouse on the Moral Law 271
  • VII - She Glosses the Text 286
  • VIII - Adventure Crowds Adventure 295
  • IX - The Patteran 304
  • X - The Brothers Touch Bottom 312
  • XI - Of Mary in the North 319
  • XII - Colloquy in the Hills 328
  • XIII - The Suamons 343
  • XIV - Vigil 356
  • XV - The Dead Hand 365
  • XVI - Wings 373
  • XVII - First Flight 385
  • Xviiii - Enter A. Bird-Catcher 393
  • XIX - Heartache and the Philosopher 407
  • XX - In Which Bingo is Unanswerable 418
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