The Campaign Manager: Running and Winning Local Elections

By Catherine M. Shaw | Go to book overview

4
Fund-raising
In this chapter
Campaign Budget
Direct Mail for Money
Special Events
Candidate Calls to Raise Money
Calling for Money for Ballot Measures
The Campaign Finance Committee
Campaign Finance Committee Packets
Fund-raising Tips
Fund-raising Ideas That Take Less Than One Month of Preparation
"Hey, Big Spender"

Your campaign theme and message are critical to a successful fund-raising effort. As indicated previously, the message is developed early so you can attract support from special interest groups promptly. This message and the relationships that develop result in endorsements and money. The endorsements will come from individuals, companies, political action committees, and formal organizations who feel your cause will further their efforts. Early endorsements equals early money equals early media buys.

"Apart from
the ballot box,
philanthropy
presents the one
opportunity the
individual has to
express his
meaningful
choice over the
direction in
which our society
will progress."
-- George Kirstein

I also look at early money as a way to communicate with the public. I want to show them that my cause or candidate has the support necessary to pull off a win. Then, throughout the campaign, I use major donors as another type of communication tool. For example, in Oregon, if individuals give more than $50 they must be listed individually, with their profession, on the Contributions and Expenditures form. I look for well-respected people who can carry, votes with their name and then ask them to give in the $250 range, or some amount that will get them listed in a prominent way in the local paper. Obviously this amount is different for different races. A $250 contribution may be news for a city councilor or alderman in a small town but would not even register in a large city mayoral race

-49-

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The Campaign Manager: Running and Winning Local Elections
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Illustrations xi
  • Preface xv
  • How to Use This Handbook 1
  • 1 - The Campaign Team 5
  • 2 - The Campaign Brochure. 17
  • 3 - The Volunteer Organization 35
  • 4 - Fund-Raising 49
  • 5 - Lawn Signs 91
  • 6 - Precinct Analysis 99
  • 7 - Canvassing 125
  • 8 - Getting-Out-The-Vote (Gotv) 137
  • 9 - Direct Mail 159
  • 10 - Media 171
  • 11 - The Candidate 205
  • 12 - The Issue-Based Campaign 235
  • 13 - The Campaign Flowchart 249
  • 14 - After the Ball 255
  • Afterword 257
  • Appendix 1 - Forms for Photocopying 259
  • Appendix 2 - The State Initiative and Referendum Process 271
  • Appendix 3 - Directory of Campaign Web Sites and Other Resources 277
  • Index 281
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