The Fateful Hoaxing of Margaret Mead: A Historical Analysis of Her Samoan Research

By Derek Freeman | Go to book overview

8
In Manu'a:
The First Two Months

ON MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1925, in the company of Ruth Holt and her newly born daughter, Moana, and numerous Samoans, Mead traveled to the island of Ta'ū in a U.S. Navy minesweeper. It was a rough passage, during which she was seasick. When they finally reached Ta'ū, a whaleboat landing schoolchildren capsized when crossing the reef. Ta'ū, a forested, reef-encircled island of fourteen square miles, rises like a huge cone to an elevation of over 3,000 feet. Some seven miles to the west lie the smaller islands of Ofu and Olosega, also volcanic in origin, which together with Ta'ū make up Manu'a. In the mid-1920s, the total population of Manu'a was 2,060. On Ta'ū, there were four different villages. On its west coast were Lumā, Si'ufaga, and Faleasao, with respective populations of 251, 331, and 274, and seven miles away at the northeast corner of the island, Fitiuta, with a population of 346. Olosega had a population of 427, and Ofu, 431. The U.S. Naval Dispensary, where Mead resided with the approval of the chief medical officer, was situated in Lumā, facing west and overlooking a lagoon and coral reef. It was a substantial weatherboard building with a corrugated iron roof. As well as housing the medical dispensary, it provided accommodation, complete with a bathroom, for Chief Pharmacist Mate Edward R. Holt, his wife, Ruth, and their children, Arthur and Moana, as well as for a "young sailor," referred to by Mead as "Sparks," who maintained and operated the radio station within this same building. There was also a Samoan "maid" named Leauala, who made faces behind Edward Holt's back. A

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Fateful Hoaxing of Margaret Mead: A Historical Analysis of Her Samoan Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 280

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.