William Lyon Mackenzie King

By Robert Macgregor Dawson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THIRTEEN
THE ELECTION OF 1921 AND CABINET FORMATION

THE GENERAL ELECTION was called for December 6, 1921. It was not entirely unexpected; for the Meighen Government was badly in need of some popular pronouncement which would determine its right to govern. The problems of peace and reconstruction, the crumbling of the coalition element in the Cabinet, the unpopularity of the Government itself, the portentous agricultural revolt, and the choice of a new Prime Minister were all reasons for seeking a fresh mandate. By-elections, moreover, had been generally unfavourable, and the Government had found it safer to allow five vacancies to remain unfilled. The parliamentary session of 1921 had seen relatively little accomplished, but although the Government majorities were small (15 to 25), they were nevertheless adequate to carry the session to completion. The three major tendencies which had appeared in the previous year continued unchecked: the contraction in the Government's majority, the spread of the Progressive disaffection, and the healing of the divisions among the Liberals. What an election would produce through the regrouping of party forces was hidden in uncertainty, with the probabilities favouring the return of Liberals, Progressives, and Conservatives in that order, but no majority for any one of them.

The outlook for the Government was dark. Many of the recent Ministers had retired or were seeking retirement, and Meighen's attempt to rebuild and strengthen his Cabinet for the election merely showed in clearer outline the difficulty of his position. He was forced to take in no less than twelve new Ministers, a number of whom were of limited capacity, and the four French Canadians in the Cabinet lacked even a seat in Parliament. The administration had inherited the accumulated antagonisms towards the Conservative and Union Governments, to which it had added one or two towards itself, so that

-348-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
William Lyon Mackenzie King
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 521

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.