East European Communities: The Struggle for Balance in Turbulent Times

By David A. Kideckel | Go to book overview
female unemployment in regions of Rostock and in Sachsen-Anhalt. These studies can be found in Elke Schmidt Landfrauen in Sachsen-Anhalt, Ministerium für Ernährung, Landwirtschafi und Forsten des Landes Sachsen-Anhalt, Magdeburg, December 1992, pp. 3-71; and in Eberhard Ackermann and Otto Seifert"Umbruch landlicher Arbeitsmarkte und Frauenbeschüftigung" in Utopie Kreativ, Nr. 6, 1993, pp. 28-35.
4.
Before World War Two, Berlin was the capital of the united Germany. After World War Two, with Germany's division into two states (i.e., the western part became the Federal Republic of Germany [FRG or in German BRD], while the eastern part became the German Democratic Republic of Germany [GDR or DDR]), the former capital was also divided. East Berlin became the capital of the GDR, and consisted of eleven urban districts or Kieze: Friedrichshain, Köpenick, Hellersdorf, Hohenschönhausen, Lichtenberg, Mahrzahn, Mitte, Pankow, Prenzlauerberg, Treptow, and Weissensee. West Berlin lost its status to Bonn as the capital of the FRG. After German unification in October 1990, east and west Berlin were again chosen to become the capital of Germany. Today, the city of Berlin is organized into twenty-three Bezirkeor districts, the eleven (mentioned above) from the former east German capital and twelve from west Berlin: Charlottenburg, Kreuzberg, Neukölln, Reinickendorf, Spandau, Schöneberg, Steglitz, Tempelhof, Tiergarten, Wedding, Wilmersdorf, and Zehlendorf. A detailed urban anthropological examination on the initial process of uniting east and west Berlin is forthcoming in H. De Soto, "The Urban Revolution: Experiences before and after the Collapse of the Berlin Wall".
5.
Because the Berlin wall was not yet erected during this time, it was still relatively easy to undertake such onerous moves to west Germany.
6.
For further information on the development of simple commodity producers in the FRG, see De Soto and Pahari (forthcoming 1994), and De Soto ( 1989).
7.
This fear is not unfounded: the waiting-list for forest sales already has 38 applicants, most from west Germany, the rest other countries. Since the highest bidder will receive the land, east Germans are likely to lose out in the competition because of lack of funds.
8.
Funk ( 1993) suggests that diverse women in post-communist societies prefer to stay at home and to enjoy "family pleasures". Our research on rural women reveals a different pattern. While it is true that many women currently pass possible jobs over to their husbands, they do that not to gain missed family pleasures, but because, "Männer wollen die Hausarbeit nicht machen" "men do not do the housework." Additionally, women say, "if men are unemployed and stay in the house, they might be drunk when we come home from work."
9.
So far over 200,000 applications for land restitution and claims have been made, and well over 500,000 hectares of land still must be returned ( Wtlpper 1993:7).

References

Ackermann, Eberhard, and Otto Seifert. 1993 "Umbruch Andlicher Arbeitsmärkte und Frauenbeschäftigung." Utopie Kreattv 6:28-35.

Anderson, David G. 1993. "Civil Society in Siberia: The Institutional Legacy of the Soviet State". In Hermine G. De Soto and David G. Anderson, eds. The Curtain

-193-

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