The Implementation of Project Management: The Professional's Handbook

By Linn C.Stuckenbruck | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

There is an often used sequence in Through the Looking Glass where Alice and the Red Queen are running as fast as they can, but the trees and other things appear to move along with them. Alice says, "In our country, you'd generally get to somewhere else -- if you ran very fast for a long time, as we've been doing.""A slow sort of country," said the Queen. "Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do to keep in the same place." Project Management is not "a slow sort of country"; management innovations, in theory and practice, happen relatively fast. In an endeavor to keep pace with these rapid changes, the Project Management Institute (PMI) was formed in 1969 as a group of concerned managers and erstwhile managers intent on improving the quality of management at all levels.

The Project Management Institute's objectives are to: (1) foster professionalism in project management; (2) provide a forum for the free exchange of project management problems, solutions, and applications; (3) encourage industrial and academic research; (4) improve communications through dialogs and discussions about terminology and techniques; (5) provide an interface between users and suppliers of hardware and software systems; and (6) provide guidelines for instruction and education, and to encourage career developments in the field of project management. This book, representing two years of conscientious effort by the Southern California Chapter of PMI, provides a concise coverage of these objectives. It will help the expert or the novice to advance the understanding of the nature of project management.

The purpose of this book is to serve as a guide for project managers, at all levels, who are considering the implementation of project management in their company or organization. It is also a how-to-do-it manual for practicing managers newly catapulted into project management, as well as a textbook for graduate level courses in management. The emphasis is not on any

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