Decoding Darkness: The Search for the Genetic Causes of Alzheimer's Disease

By Rudolph E. Tanzi; Ann B. Parson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The idea for this book occurred on Boston's Storrow Drive on November 7, 1995. That day's horoscope in the Boston Globe seemed to indicate a go. Its advice: "Eliminate the word 'impossible' from your vocabulary." Keeping that word at bay ever since, a wide circle of people have fortified and inspired this book project each step of the way. Very certainly, it's impossible to thank you enough.

In special, we are deeply grateful to Joy Glenner, for her shared remembrances of her husband and her enthusiastic support; to Cai'ne Wong, for his scrupulous descriptions of the science in George Glenner's lab; to Jim Gusella, for his considerable guidance and fact-checking, especially as pertains to the Huntington's work; to Dennis Selkoe, for his close reading of several chapters, his helpful corrections, and his contribution of so many key details; to Bill Comer, for innumerable wise insights into the pharmaceutical world and for being a savvy mentor; to Robert Terry, for laying out the historical backdrop and for also being a savvy mentor; to Wilma Wasco, John Hardy, Mike Mullan, Jerry Schellenberg, Christine Van Broeckhoven, Dale Schenk, and John Breitner for their extensive input and review of certain sections; to Paul Raia, for his open-door counsel; to Jean-Paul Vonsattel, for his in-depth tutelage in neuropathology; to Kathleen Ottina, for her patient explanations; and to the triumvirate partners -- Steve Wagner and Sam Sisodia -- each of whom lent large. We are indebted as well to Carmela Abraham and Dora Kovacs, for their insights and for permitting us to use their photographs. Posthumous tribute goes to Henry Wisniewski who left us with many valuable points of reference, as well as the mandate to tell some good stories.

The Noonan family gave this book the invaluable reality of what an at-risk family is faced with. To Julie, Pat, Malcolm, Eryc, Fran, and the

-xi-

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Decoding Darkness: The Search for the Genetic Causes of Alzheimer's Disease
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • One - Cleave, Zap, Blot, Probe *
  • Two - The Core of the Matter 20
  • Three - Candidate Chromosome 48
  • Four - Gone Fishing 60
  • Five - Curious Gene 84
  • Six - From Famine to Feast 98
  • Seven - Mutations, Revelations 114
  • Eight - Of Mice and People 134
  • Nine - Gene Prix 146
  • Ten - The 42 Nidus 172
  • Eleven - Untangling a Cascade 190
  • Twelve - A Gamble for Hope 206
  • Epilogue 240
  • Resources 249
  • Notes 251
  • Index 269
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