Nongovernments: NGOs and the Political Development of the Third World

By Julie Fisher | Go to book overview

2
Government Policies
Toward NGOs:
Political Context and the
Growth of Civil Society

Power comes from the people But where does it go? And how does it happen That it gets to such a place?

-- Vladimir Vysotsky (the late Soviet popular singer)

DO GOVERNMENTS LEAR N from nongovernmental organizations (NGOs)? The answer to this question depends on the behavior of both sides. This chapter, which focuses on the impact of governments on NGOs, begins with a discussion of government policies toward NGOs, which range from repressive to mutually beneficial relationships. The remainder of the chapter focuses on a number of factors that help determine government policies toward NGOs, beginning with an exploration of differences in NGO-government relationships in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Yet geographic differences have less explanatory value than the direct and indirect impact of the broader political context, which is covered in the third section. Governments may be autocratic or democratic, stable or unstable; they may be subject to strong political cultures or traditions, and they may differ from one another in their ability to implement policy. Any of these contextual variables can directly affect policies toward NGOs. Yet context also has an indirect effect on government policies toward NGOs by influencing NGO proliferation. As increasing numbers of NGOs contribute to the emergence of stronger civil societies, governments face a changing political context, which forces them to reevaluate previous policies toward NGOs. Governments also reexamine policies toward NGOs because of changes they make in their own management.

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Nongovernments: NGOs and the Political Development of the Third World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Ngos, Civil Society, and Political Development 1
  • Notes 32
  • 2 - Government Policies Toward Ngos: Political Context and the Growth of Civil Society 39
  • Notes 69
  • 3 the Impact of NGOs on Governments: the Role of NGO Autonomy 75
  • Notes 99
  • 4 - Promoting Democratization and Sustainable Development 105
  • Notes 132
  • 5 - Subnational Governments and Ngos 135
  • Notes 155
  • 6 - Civil Society, Democracy, and Political Development 159
  • Notes 187
  • Glossary 191
  • References 193
  • Index 227
  • About the Author 237
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