The Crime Conundrum: Essays on Criminal Justice

By Lawrence M. Friedman; George Fisher | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
Clifford Krauss, "Mystery of New York, the Suddenly Safer City", in New York Times, July 23, 1995, sec. 4, p. 1, late edition.
2.
Fox Butterfield, "Many Cities in U.S. Show Sharp Drop in Homicide Rate", in New York Times, August 13 , 1995, sec. 1, p. 6, late edition.
3.
Murders in 1995 were down from the previous year by 32 percent in Seattle, 28 percent in San Antonio, 25 percent in New York City, 21 percent in San Diego, and 20 percent in Houston. In absolute numbers, New York City had 389 fewer murders in 1995 than in 1994; Chicago had 107 fewer murders. Eric Pooley, "One Good Apple", in Time, January 15, 1996, p. 56, table.
4.
Tom Morganthau, "The Lull Before the Storm?" in Newsweek, December 4, 1995, p. 42.
5.
Richard Zoglin, "Now for the Bad News: A Teenage Time Bomb", in Time, January 15, 1996, pp. 52-53.
6.
Nils Christie has warned of the risks European countries incur when their reference group in discussions of crime policy is the U.S. Nils Christie, Crime Control as Industry: Toward GULAGS, Western Style, 2d ed. ( London: Routledge, 1993), pp. 58,199.
7.
Franklin Zimring and Gordon Hawkins, "Transnational Patterns" (chapter from an unpublished manuscript presented at the Criminal Justice Research Conference, Stanford Law School, October 1995).
8.
Ibid., p. 37.
9.
Ibid., p. 2.
10.
World Health Organization, World Health Statistics Annual: Vital, Statistics and Causes of Death ( Geneva: World Health Organization, 1995).
11.
Ibid. Were age-, sex-, and race-specific homicide death rates available, it is likely we would see another demographically distinctive dimension to homicide in the U.S. Certainly in the U.S. young black males face much higher risks of death from homicide than do young white males. The cross-national data necessary to determine whether a black-white difference exists in other countries are not available, however.
12.
Quoted by Morganthau in "Lull before the Storm", pp. 41-42.
13.
R. Easterlin, Birth and Fortune: The Impact of Large Numbers on Personal Welfare ( New York: Basic Books, 1980), pp. 101-04,146-48.
14.
Lawrence E. Cohen and Kenneth C. Land, "Age Structure and Crime: Symmetry Versus Asymmetry and the Projection of Crime Rates Through the 1990s"," in American Sociological Review, Vol. 52, No. 1, February 1987, pp. 170-84; Charles F. Wellford, "Age Composition and the Increase in Recorded Crime", in Criminology, Vol. 11, No. 1, May 1973, pp. 61-70.
15.
President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice, The Challenge of Crime in a Free Society ( Washington, D.C., 1967), p. 28.
16.
Cohen and Land, "Age structure and Crime", p. 180. The strong relationship between age structure and U.S. homicide rates observed in time-series analyses does not consistently emerge in cross-sectional analyses. Kenneth C. Land, PatriciaL. McCall

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Crime Conundrum: Essays on Criminal Justice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 210

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.