Local Parties in Political and Organizational Perspective

By Martin Saiz; Hans Geser | Go to book overview

Appendix:
Synopsis of Hypotheses

1. The basic characteristics of local parties
In contrast to supralocal party organizations, local parties are likely to possess the following characteristics:
1. They are typically "Janus-faced" because they have to play their political role within the respective community with their intraparty position and functions.
2. Much party work is done by unpaid volunteers, so the party remains dependent on the individuals or groups providing such support (e.g., local notables).
3. Many members (even activists and formal role incumbents) are rather inexperienced and in the "training stages" of their (eventual) political career.
4. Members and adherents stem from more diverse segments of the population (including also individuals from lower and rather "unpolitical") strata.
5. Intraparty commitment and integration is strongly based on social incentives, whereas ideological, genuinely "political" motivations are less prevalent.
6. The commitment of activists depends on supralocal factors (e.g., their long-term perspective of gaining attractive supralocal positions).
7. Because gatherings are easy, parties can react quickly to changing situations without curtailing internal democratic procedures.
8. Informal processes of recruitment and campaigning (e.g., based on face-to-face canvassing) is important, whereas the use of mass media or other modern communication technologies is less important.

2. The functional significance of local sections
for supralocal parties
Parties with widespread networks of local sections are likely to enjoy the following characteristics:
1. The total number of members and adherents is increased.

-335-

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Local Parties in Political and Organizational Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures ix
  • Part One - Theoretical Orientation and Empirical Observations 1
  • 1 - The Local Party as an Object of Interdisciplinary Comparative Study 3
  • Notes 37
  • References 39
  • 2 - Local Political Parties in Comparative Perspective 44
  • Notes 70
  • References 71
  • Part Two - Local Political Parties in Local and National Context 75
  • Notes 98
  • References 98
  • 4 - Local Parties in England 101
  • Notes 121
  • 5 - Local Parties in the German Countryside 123
  • Notes 149
  • References 149
  • 6 - Local Parties and Electioneering in Germany 151
  • Notes 169
  • References 169
  • 7 - Do Political Parties Matter in U.S. Cities? 171
  • Notes 189
  • 8 - Forms of Patronage and Political Parties in the Italian City 191
  • Notes 210
  • References 211
  • 9 - Local Parties in Switzerland 213
  • Notes 239
  • 10 - Local Party Organizations in Denmark 242
  • Notes 269
  • References 270
  • 11 - The Local Party System in Poland 273
  • References 281
  • 12 from Communist Predominance to Multiparty System 283
  • Notes 306
  • Part Three - Conclusion 311
  • References 334
  • Appendix: - Synopsis of Hypotheses 335
  • Index 339
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