Broken Contract? Changing Relationships between Americans and Their Government

By Stephen C. Craig | Go to book overview

1
Change and the
American Electorate

STEPHEN C. CRAIG

On January 20, 1993, with Bill Clinton sworn in as our forty-second president and the Democrats assuming control of both elected branches of government, it seemed possible to believe that the era of gridlock was over and that maybe -- just maybe -- Washington's political class would respond to the message of urgency and concern sent by voters when they cast their ballots two-and-a-half months earlier. According to Newsweek columnist Joe Klein, 1992 had been a year in which "civilians dragged the politicians, [campaign professionals] and press kicking and screaming into the election they wanted. It was a year [when] the mystique of pollsters, strategists and mediamasters was put in proper perspective. It was, at long last, the Year of the Voter." An electorate that was typically "apathetic, malleable" and bored with politics became suddenly "obsessed" with the process, seeing the presidential contest in particular as a "turning point" for the nation and following campaign events with a heightened sense of purpose. "Everywhere you went," said Klein ( 1992, p. 14), "on supermarket checkout lines, in coffee shops and saloons, around kitchen tables . . . the talk was of Ross and George and Bill." And when it was over, there was a cautious optimism that things would be different.

That, however, was then and this is now. On January 4, 1995, Newt Gingrich took the oath as Speaker of the House of Representatives, Republicans ascended to the majority in both houses of Congress for the first time in more than forty years, and the world of Washington politics -- along with the politics of many states (where the GOP enjoyed dramatic gains in 1994 gubernatorial and legislative races) -- was turned upside down once again. Clinton and the Democrats had not necessarily failed, at least by traditional standards, but they fell far short of implementing the agenda of social and institutional "change" that was critical to their success in the previous election. As it happens, voters were not of a mood to be patient: Given the choice between politics as usual and a bold (albeit uncertain) new beginning, they resoundingly opted for the latter.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Broken Contract? Changing Relationships between Americans and Their Government
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.