The Two Faces of Civil Society: NGOs and Politics in Africa

By Stephen N. Ndegwa | Go to book overview

2
The Political Context of
NGOs in Africa

OVER THE LAST TWO DECADES, there has been growing evidence of the inability of the African state to deliver on its development promise. Indeed, the state in Africa has variously been described as "weak" or "soft" -- in other words, unable to pursue its objectives ( Migdal 1988; Jackson and Rosberg 1986). Progressively, the proposition that the postindependence African state is indeed the problem and the inhibitor of social, economic, and political development has become the common view among students of African development. This amounts to a turnaround in development theory, which previously held the state to be the ultimate purveyor of development in Africa. That this shift has taken root in the current thinking on development is suggested not only by the expansive literature on the demise of the African state and the ascendancy of civil society ( Rothchild and Chazan 1988) but also by the policies of donor agencies and development practitioners (see Brown and Korten 1989; Best and Brown 1990; World Bank 1989).

Thus, in the study of political development, analysts have come full circle from the statist arguments of the late 1960s and 1970s. For example, the previous concern with the ability of newly independent states to govern (and develop) their populations ( Huntington 1968) has evolved into the present preoccupation with the legitimacy of states in civil society ( Hyden and Bratton 1992). The serious and largely successful challenges faced by formerly autocratic states from their citizens (for example, in eastern Europe and Latin America) have thrust the question of democratization to the fore in the study of political development. The prevailing wisdom holds that to institute governments that are anchored in democratic institutions and ethos such as accountability and transparency (euphemistically referred to as "good governance"), it is necessary to have an active and developed civil society that will hold the state to account in various arenas.

-15-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Two Faces of Civil Society: NGOs and Politics in Africa
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Abbreviations and Glossary xi
  • 1 - The Promise of Democracy 1
  • Notes 12
  • 2 - The Political Context of Ngos in Africa 15
  • Notes 30
  • 3 - Ngos and the State in Kenya 31
  • Notes 53
  • 4 - The Undugu Society, of Kenya 55
  • Notes 78
  • 5 - The Green Belt Movement 81
  • Notes 105
  • 6 - Ngos, Civil Society, and Democratization 109
  • Notes 117
  • Appendix a Undugu Society of Kenya 119
  • Appendix Bthe Green Belt Movement 123
  • References 125
  • Index 135
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 141

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.